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Title: Running SW4 On New Commodity Technology Systems (CTS-1) Platform

Abstract

We have recently been running earthquake ground motion simulations with SW4 on the new capacity computing systems, called the Commodity Technology Systems - 1 (CTS-1) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). SW4 is a fourth order time domain finite difference code developed by LLNL and distributed by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG). SW4 simulates seismic wave propagation in complex three-dimensional Earth models including anelasticity and surface topography. We are modeling near-fault earthquake strong ground motions for the purposes of evaluating the response of engineered structures, such as nuclear power plants and other critical infrastructure. Engineering analysis of structures requires the inclusion of high frequencies which can cause damage, but are often difficult to include in simulations because of the need for large memory to model fine grid spacing on large domains.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1321435
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-702064
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Rodgers, Arthur J., Petersson, N. Anders, Pitarka, Arben, and Sjogreen, Bjorn. Running SW4 On New Commodity Technology Systems (CTS-1) Platform. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1321435.
Rodgers, Arthur J., Petersson, N. Anders, Pitarka, Arben, & Sjogreen, Bjorn. Running SW4 On New Commodity Technology Systems (CTS-1) Platform. United States. doi:10.2172/1321435.
Rodgers, Arthur J., Petersson, N. Anders, Pitarka, Arben, and Sjogreen, Bjorn. 2016. "Running SW4 On New Commodity Technology Systems (CTS-1) Platform". United States. doi:10.2172/1321435. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1321435.
@article{osti_1321435,
title = {Running SW4 On New Commodity Technology Systems (CTS-1) Platform},
author = {Rodgers, Arthur J. and Petersson, N. Anders and Pitarka, Arben and Sjogreen, Bjorn},
abstractNote = {We have recently been running earthquake ground motion simulations with SW4 on the new capacity computing systems, called the Commodity Technology Systems - 1 (CTS-1) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). SW4 is a fourth order time domain finite difference code developed by LLNL and distributed by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG). SW4 simulates seismic wave propagation in complex three-dimensional Earth models including anelasticity and surface topography. We are modeling near-fault earthquake strong ground motions for the purposes of evaluating the response of engineered structures, such as nuclear power plants and other critical infrastructure. Engineering analysis of structures requires the inclusion of high frequencies which can cause damage, but are often difficult to include in simulations because of the need for large memory to model fine grid spacing on large domains.},
doi = {10.2172/1321435},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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