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Title: The Study of Advanced Accelerator Physics Research at UCLA Using the ATF at BNL: Vacuum Acceleration by Laser of Free Electrons

Abstract

An experiment was designed and data were taken to demonstrate that a tightly focused laser on vacuum can accelerate an electron beam in free space. The experiment was proof-of-principle and showed a clear effect for the laser beam off and on. The size of the effect was about 20% and was consistent over 30 laser and beam shots.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1320698
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCLA-07887
TRN: US1700265
DOE Contract Number:
SC0007887
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; BNL; LASER RADIATION; ACCELERATION; UCLA; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; MEV RANGE 10-100; BEAM PROFILES; Vacuum Acceleration by Laser of Free Electrons

Citation Formats

Cline, David B. The Study of Advanced Accelerator Physics Research at UCLA Using the ATF at BNL: Vacuum Acceleration by Laser of Free Electrons. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1320698.
Cline, David B. The Study of Advanced Accelerator Physics Research at UCLA Using the ATF at BNL: Vacuum Acceleration by Laser of Free Electrons. United States. doi:10.2172/1320698.
Cline, David B. 2016. "The Study of Advanced Accelerator Physics Research at UCLA Using the ATF at BNL: Vacuum Acceleration by Laser of Free Electrons". United States. doi:10.2172/1320698. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1320698.
@article{osti_1320698,
title = {The Study of Advanced Accelerator Physics Research at UCLA Using the ATF at BNL: Vacuum Acceleration by Laser of Free Electrons},
author = {Cline, David B.},
abstractNote = {An experiment was designed and data were taken to demonstrate that a tightly focused laser on vacuum can accelerate an electron beam in free space. The experiment was proof-of-principle and showed a clear effect for the laser beam off and on. The size of the effect was about 20% and was consistent over 30 laser and beam shots.},
doi = {10.2172/1320698},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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