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Title: Symposium KK, Resonant Optics in Dielectric and Metallic Structures: Fundamentals and Applications

Abstract

Symposium KK focused on the design, fabrication, characterization of novel nanoscale optical resonators and alternative materials for sub-diffraction scale resonant particles. Contributions discussed all aspects of this field, and the organizers had more than 130 contributing participants to this session alone, spanning North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Participants discussed cutting edge research results focused on the structure, physical and optical properties, and ultrafast dynamic response of nanoscale resonators such as plasmonic and dielectric nanoparticles. A strong focus on state-of-the-art characterization and fabrication approaches, as well as presentations on novel materials for sub-diffraction resonators took place. As expected, the sessions provided strong interdisciplinary interactions and lively debate among presenters and participants.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)
  2. Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Materials Research Society, Warrendale, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1319576
Report Number(s):
DE-SC0011821
DOE Contract Number:
SC0011821
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; nanoscale optical resonators; plasmonics; dielectric nanoparticles; sub-diffraction resonators

Citation Formats

Larouche, Stephane, and Caldwell, Joshua. Symposium KK, Resonant Optics in Dielectric and Metallic Structures: Fundamentals and Applications. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1319576.
Larouche, Stephane, & Caldwell, Joshua. Symposium KK, Resonant Optics in Dielectric and Metallic Structures: Fundamentals and Applications. United States. doi:10.2172/1319576.
Larouche, Stephane, and Caldwell, Joshua. 2016. "Symposium KK, Resonant Optics in Dielectric and Metallic Structures: Fundamentals and Applications". United States. doi:10.2172/1319576. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1319576.
@article{osti_1319576,
title = {Symposium KK, Resonant Optics in Dielectric and Metallic Structures: Fundamentals and Applications},
author = {Larouche, Stephane and Caldwell, Joshua},
abstractNote = {Symposium KK focused on the design, fabrication, characterization of novel nanoscale optical resonators and alternative materials for sub-diffraction scale resonant particles. Contributions discussed all aspects of this field, and the organizers had more than 130 contributing participants to this session alone, spanning North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Participants discussed cutting edge research results focused on the structure, physical and optical properties, and ultrafast dynamic response of nanoscale resonators such as plasmonic and dielectric nanoparticles. A strong focus on state-of-the-art characterization and fabrication approaches, as well as presentations on novel materials for sub-diffraction resonators took place. As expected, the sessions provided strong interdisciplinary interactions and lively debate among presenters and participants.},
doi = {10.2172/1319576},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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