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Title: Measurement of solid rocket propellant exhaust gas temperatures using molecular spectroscopic methods.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1315334
Report Number(s):
SAND2014-17746C
537551
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the NATAS Conference held September 14-17, 2014 in Santa Fe, NM.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Coker, Eric Nicholas, Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto, van Swol, Frank B., Gill, Walter, David Surmick, Leland Sharp, Bystrom, Edward, and Haug, Aren D. Measurement of solid rocket propellant exhaust gas temperatures using molecular spectroscopic methods.. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Coker, Eric Nicholas, Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto, van Swol, Frank B., Gill, Walter, David Surmick, Leland Sharp, Bystrom, Edward, & Haug, Aren D. Measurement of solid rocket propellant exhaust gas temperatures using molecular spectroscopic methods.. United States.
Coker, Eric Nicholas, Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto, van Swol, Frank B., Gill, Walter, David Surmick, Leland Sharp, Bystrom, Edward, and Haug, Aren D. Mon . "Measurement of solid rocket propellant exhaust gas temperatures using molecular spectroscopic methods.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1315334.
@article{osti_1315334,
title = {Measurement of solid rocket propellant exhaust gas temperatures using molecular spectroscopic methods.},
author = {Coker, Eric Nicholas and Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto and van Swol, Frank B. and Gill, Walter and David Surmick and Leland Sharp and Bystrom, Edward and Haug, Aren D.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Conference:
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