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Title: Comparative Cooling Season Performance of Air Distribution Systems in Multistory Townhomes

Abstract

IBACOS investigated the performance of a small-diameter high velocity heat pump system compared to a conventional system in a new construction triplex townhouse. A ductless heat pump system also was installed for comparison, but the homebuyer backed out because of aesthetic concerns about that system. In total, two buildings, having identical solar orientation and comprised of six townhomes, were monitored for comfort and energy performance. Results show that the small-diameter system provides more uniform temperatures from floor to floor in the three-story townhome. No clear energy consumption benefit was observed from either system. The builder is continuing to explore the small-diameter system as its new standard system to provide better comfort and indoor air quality. The homebuilder also explored the possibility of shifting its townhome product to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home National Program Requirements. Ultimately, the builder decided that adoption of these practices would be too disruptive midstream in the construction cycle. However, the townhomes met the ENERGY STAR Version 3.0 program requirements.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. IBACOS Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  2. IBACOS Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1314864
Report Number(s):
NREL/SR-5500-65315; DOE/GO-102016-4803
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308; KNDJ-0-40341-05
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; residential; Residential Buildings; IBACOS; Building America; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC); small-diameter ductwork; high velocity ducts; townhome; stratification; comfort; air conditioning; air distribution system; ductless mini-split heat pumps

Citation Formats

Poerschke, Andrew, Beach, Rob, and Beggs, Timothy. Comparative Cooling Season Performance of Air Distribution Systems in Multistory Townhomes. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1314864.
Poerschke, Andrew, Beach, Rob, & Beggs, Timothy. Comparative Cooling Season Performance of Air Distribution Systems in Multistory Townhomes. United States. doi:10.2172/1314864.
Poerschke, Andrew, Beach, Rob, and Beggs, Timothy. 2016. "Comparative Cooling Season Performance of Air Distribution Systems in Multistory Townhomes". United States. doi:10.2172/1314864. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1314864.
@article{osti_1314864,
title = {Comparative Cooling Season Performance of Air Distribution Systems in Multistory Townhomes},
author = {Poerschke, Andrew and Beach, Rob and Beggs, Timothy},
abstractNote = {IBACOS investigated the performance of a small-diameter high velocity heat pump system compared to a conventional system in a new construction triplex townhouse. A ductless heat pump system also was installed for comparison, but the homebuyer backed out because of aesthetic concerns about that system. In total, two buildings, having identical solar orientation and comprised of six townhomes, were monitored for comfort and energy performance. Results show that the small-diameter system provides more uniform temperatures from floor to floor in the three-story townhome. No clear energy consumption benefit was observed from either system. The builder is continuing to explore the small-diameter system as its new standard system to provide better comfort and indoor air quality. The homebuilder also explored the possibility of shifting its townhome product to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home National Program Requirements. Ultimately, the builder decided that adoption of these practices would be too disruptive midstream in the construction cycle. However, the townhomes met the ENERGY STAR Version 3.0 program requirements.},
doi = {10.2172/1314864},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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