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Title: X-ray diffraction of molybdenum under ramp compression to 1 TPa

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1314345
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0002154; NA0002720; AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review B
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 94; Journal Issue: 10; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-09-01 18:14:34; Journal ID: ISSN 2469-9950
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wang, Jue, Coppari, Federica, Smith, Raymond F., Eggert, Jon H., Lazicki, Amy E., Fratanduono, Dayne E., Rygg, J. Ryan, Boehly, Thomas R., Collins, Gilbert W., and Duffy, Thomas S. X-ray diffraction of molybdenum under ramp compression to 1 TPa. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.94.104102.
Wang, Jue, Coppari, Federica, Smith, Raymond F., Eggert, Jon H., Lazicki, Amy E., Fratanduono, Dayne E., Rygg, J. Ryan, Boehly, Thomas R., Collins, Gilbert W., & Duffy, Thomas S. X-ray diffraction of molybdenum under ramp compression to 1 TPa. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.94.104102.
Wang, Jue, Coppari, Federica, Smith, Raymond F., Eggert, Jon H., Lazicki, Amy E., Fratanduono, Dayne E., Rygg, J. Ryan, Boehly, Thomas R., Collins, Gilbert W., and Duffy, Thomas S. 2016. "X-ray diffraction of molybdenum under ramp compression to 1 TPa". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.94.104102.
@article{osti_1314345,
title = {X-ray diffraction of molybdenum under ramp compression to 1 TPa},
author = {Wang, Jue and Coppari, Federica and Smith, Raymond F. and Eggert, Jon H. and Lazicki, Amy E. and Fratanduono, Dayne E. and Rygg, J. Ryan and Boehly, Thomas R. and Collins, Gilbert W. and Duffy, Thomas S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.94.104102},
journal = {Physical Review B},
number = 10,
volume = 94,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.104102

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  • Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPSmore » experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. Additionally, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for multiaxial loadings.« less
  • Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPSmore » experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. Additionally, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for multiaxial loadings.« less
  • Cited by 5
  • Molybdenum (Mo) is a body-centered-cubic (bcc) transition metal that has widespread technological applications. Although the bcc transition elements are used as test cases for understanding the behavior of metals under extreme conditions, the melting curves and phase transitions of these elements have been the subject of stark disagreements in recent years. Here we use x-ray diffraction to examine the phase stability and melting behavior of Mo under shock loading to 450 GPa. The bcc phase of Mo remains stable along the Hugoniot until 380 GPa. Here, our results do not support previous claims of a shallow melting curve for molybdenum.