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Title: Molecular Understanding of USP7 Substrate Recognition and C-Terminal Activation

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Genentech
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
INDUSTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1314262
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Structure; Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Rouge, Lionel, Bainbridge, Travis W., Kwok, Michael, Tong, Raymond, Lello, Paola Di, Wertz, Ingrid E., Maurer, Till, Ernst, James A., and Murray, Jeremy. Molecular Understanding of USP7 Substrate Recognition and C-Terminal Activation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.str.2016.05.020.
Rouge, Lionel, Bainbridge, Travis W., Kwok, Michael, Tong, Raymond, Lello, Paola Di, Wertz, Ingrid E., Maurer, Till, Ernst, James A., & Murray, Jeremy. Molecular Understanding of USP7 Substrate Recognition and C-Terminal Activation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.str.2016.05.020.
Rouge, Lionel, Bainbridge, Travis W., Kwok, Michael, Tong, Raymond, Lello, Paola Di, Wertz, Ingrid E., Maurer, Till, Ernst, James A., and Murray, Jeremy. 2016. "Molecular Understanding of USP7 Substrate Recognition and C-Terminal Activation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.str.2016.05.020.
@article{osti_1314262,
title = {Molecular Understanding of USP7 Substrate Recognition and C-Terminal Activation},
author = {Rouge, Lionel and Bainbridge, Travis W. and Kwok, Michael and Tong, Raymond and Lello, Paola Di and Wertz, Ingrid E. and Maurer, Till and Ernst, James A. and Murray, Jeremy},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.str.2016.05.020},
journal = {Structure},
number = 8,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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