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Title: Introduction to Numerical Methods

Abstract

These are slides for a lecture for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship at the National Security Education Center. This gives an introduction to numerical methods. Repetitive algorithms are used to obtain approximate solutions to mathematical problems, using sorting, searching, root finding, optimization, interpolation, extrapolation, least squares regresion, Eigenvalue problems, ordinary differential equations, and partial differential equations. Many equations are shown. Discretizations allow us to approximate solutions to mathematical models of physical systems using a repetitive algorithm and introduce errors that can lead to numerical instabilities if we are not careful.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1312632
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-26530
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Mathematics

Citation Formats

Schoonover, Joseph A. Introduction to Numerical Methods. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1312632.
Schoonover, Joseph A. Introduction to Numerical Methods. United States. doi:10.2172/1312632.
Schoonover, Joseph A. 2016. "Introduction to Numerical Methods". United States. doi:10.2172/1312632. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1312632.
@article{osti_1312632,
title = {Introduction to Numerical Methods},
author = {Schoonover, Joseph A.},
abstractNote = {These are slides for a lecture for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship at the National Security Education Center. This gives an introduction to numerical methods. Repetitive algorithms are used to obtain approximate solutions to mathematical problems, using sorting, searching, root finding, optimization, interpolation, extrapolation, least squares regresion, Eigenvalue problems, ordinary differential equations, and partial differential equations. Many equations are shown. Discretizations allow us to approximate solutions to mathematical models of physical systems using a repetitive algorithm and introduce errors that can lead to numerical instabilities if we are not careful.},
doi = {10.2172/1312632},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

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