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Title: Special Nuclear Material Gamma-Ray Signatures for Reachback Analysts

Abstract

These are slides on special nuclear material gamma-ray signatures for reachback analysts for an LSS Spectroscopy course. The closing thoughts for this presentation are the following: SNM materials have definite spectral signatures that should be readily recognizable to analysts in both bare and shielded configurations. One can estimate burnup of plutonium using certain pairs of peaks that are a few keV apart. In most cases, one cannot reliably estimate uranium enrichment in an analogous way to the estimation of plutonium burnup. The origin of the most intense peaks from some SNM items may be indirect and from ‘associated nuclides.' Indirect SNM signatures sometimes have commonalities with the natural gamma-ray background.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1312618
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-26068
TRN: US1601820
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; GAMMA SPECTRA; PLUTONIUM; URANIUM; KEV RANGE; NATURAL RADIOACTIVITY; BURNUP; PEAKS; FISSILE MATERIALS; GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY; LIQUID SCINTILLATION DETECTORS; ISOTOPE RATIO; TRAINING; gamma; plutonium; special nuclear material

Citation Formats

Karpius, Peter Joseph, and Myers, Steven Charles. Special Nuclear Material Gamma-Ray Signatures for Reachback Analysts. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1312618.
Karpius, Peter Joseph, & Myers, Steven Charles. Special Nuclear Material Gamma-Ray Signatures for Reachback Analysts. United States. doi:10.2172/1312618.
Karpius, Peter Joseph, and Myers, Steven Charles. 2016. "Special Nuclear Material Gamma-Ray Signatures for Reachback Analysts". United States. doi:10.2172/1312618. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1312618.
@article{osti_1312618,
title = {Special Nuclear Material Gamma-Ray Signatures for Reachback Analysts},
author = {Karpius, Peter Joseph and Myers, Steven Charles},
abstractNote = {These are slides on special nuclear material gamma-ray signatures for reachback analysts for an LSS Spectroscopy course. The closing thoughts for this presentation are the following: SNM materials have definite spectral signatures that should be readily recognizable to analysts in both bare and shielded configurations. One can estimate burnup of plutonium using certain pairs of peaks that are a few keV apart. In most cases, one cannot reliably estimate uranium enrichment in an analogous way to the estimation of plutonium burnup. The origin of the most intense peaks from some SNM items may be indirect and from ‘associated nuclides.' Indirect SNM signatures sometimes have commonalities with the natural gamma-ray background.},
doi = {10.2172/1312618},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.
  • This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy course and provides an overview of the following concepts: detector system components, intrinsic and absolute efficiency, resolution and linearity, and operational issues and limits.
  • This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C26.10 on Nondestructive Assay. The current edition was approved on July 10, 1996 and published in September 1996.
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