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Title: Optimal Control of a Surge-Mode WEC in Random Waves

Abstract

The objective of this project was to develop one or more real-time feedback and feed-forward (MPC) control algorithms for an Oscillating Surge Wave Converter (OSWC) developed by RME called SurgeWEC™ that leverages recent innovations in wave energy converter (WEC) control theory to maximize power production in random wave environments. The control algorithms synthesized innovations in dynamic programming and nonlinear wave dynamics using anticipatory wave sensors and localized sensor measurements; e.g. position and velocity of the WEC Power Take Off (PTO), with predictive wave forecasting data. The result was an advanced control system that uses feedback or feed-forward data from an array of sensor channels comprised of both localized and deployed sensors fused into a single decision process that optimally compensates for uncertainties in the system dynamics, wave forecasts, and sensor measurement errors.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States)
  2. Re Vision Consulting, Sacramento, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  4. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1311823
Report Number(s):
DOE-RME-0006402
81.087
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006402
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; wave energy; MHK; advanced controls

Citation Formats

Chertok, Allan, Ceberio, Olivier, Staby, Bill, Previsic, Mirko, Scruggs, Jeffrey, and Van de Ven, James. Optimal Control of a Surge-Mode WEC in Random Waves. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1311823.
Chertok, Allan, Ceberio, Olivier, Staby, Bill, Previsic, Mirko, Scruggs, Jeffrey, & Van de Ven, James. Optimal Control of a Surge-Mode WEC in Random Waves. United States. doi:10.2172/1311823.
Chertok, Allan, Ceberio, Olivier, Staby, Bill, Previsic, Mirko, Scruggs, Jeffrey, and Van de Ven, James. 2016. "Optimal Control of a Surge-Mode WEC in Random Waves". United States. doi:10.2172/1311823. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1311823.
@article{osti_1311823,
title = {Optimal Control of a Surge-Mode WEC in Random Waves},
author = {Chertok, Allan and Ceberio, Olivier and Staby, Bill and Previsic, Mirko and Scruggs, Jeffrey and Van de Ven, James},
abstractNote = {The objective of this project was to develop one or more real-time feedback and feed-forward (MPC) control algorithms for an Oscillating Surge Wave Converter (OSWC) developed by RME called SurgeWEC™ that leverages recent innovations in wave energy converter (WEC) control theory to maximize power production in random wave environments. The control algorithms synthesized innovations in dynamic programming and nonlinear wave dynamics using anticipatory wave sensors and localized sensor measurements; e.g. position and velocity of the WEC Power Take Off (PTO), with predictive wave forecasting data. The result was an advanced control system that uses feedback or feed-forward data from an array of sensor channels comprised of both localized and deployed sensors fused into a single decision process that optimally compensates for uncertainties in the system dynamics, wave forecasts, and sensor measurement errors.},
doi = {10.2172/1311823},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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