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Title: Virtual Flight through a Catalyst Particle

Abstract

This visualization of the experimental data shows how scientists mapped the distribution of chemical elements in a single fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle and merged it with structural information about the pore networks. Because of the high resolution at which they mapped the catalyst, they were able to look deep into the pores and learn more about the metal poisoning reaction. The changing colors of the "fog" inside the pores reflect the changing chemistry.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1311769
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; GASOLINE; CATALYST; STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE; X-RAYS; 3D STRUCTURE

Citation Formats

None. Virtual Flight through a Catalyst Particle. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
None. Virtual Flight through a Catalyst Particle. United States.
None. Tue . "Virtual Flight through a Catalyst Particle". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1311769.
@article{osti_1311769,
title = {Virtual Flight through a Catalyst Particle},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {This visualization of the experimental data shows how scientists mapped the distribution of chemical elements in a single fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle and merged it with structural information about the pore networks. Because of the high resolution at which they mapped the catalyst, they were able to look deep into the pores and learn more about the metal poisoning reaction. The changing colors of the "fog" inside the pores reflect the changing chemistry.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 30 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Aug 30 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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