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Title: Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3-D Printed Object

Abstract

Researchers at the MDF have 3D-printed a large-scale trim tool for a Boeing 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet airliner. The additively manufactured tool was printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine over a 30-hour period. The team used a thermoplastic pellet comprised of 80% ABS plastic and 20% carbon fiber from local material supplier. The tool has proven to decrease time, labor, cost and errors associated with traditional manufacturing techniques and increased energy savings in preliminary testing and will undergo further, long term testing.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1311719
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 3D PRINTED; BIG AREA ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING; BAAM; BOEING 777X

Citation Formats

None. Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3-D Printed Object. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
None. Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3-D Printed Object. United States.
None. 2016. "Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3-D Printed Object". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1311719.
@article{osti_1311719,
title = {Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3-D Printed Object},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Researchers at the MDF have 3D-printed a large-scale trim tool for a Boeing 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet airliner. The additively manufactured tool was printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine over a 30-hour period. The team used a thermoplastic pellet comprised of 80% ABS plastic and 20% carbon fiber from local material supplier. The tool has proven to decrease time, labor, cost and errors associated with traditional manufacturing techniques and increased energy savings in preliminary testing and will undergo further, long term testing.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
  • Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have 3D-printed a large-scale trim tool for a Boeing 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet airliner. The additively manufactured tool was printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine over a 30-hour period. The team used a thermoplastic pellet comprised of 80% ABS plastic and 20% carbon fiber from local material supplier. The tool has proven to decrease time, labor, cost and errors associated with traditional manufacturing techniques and increased energy savings in preliminary testing and will undergo further, long term testing.
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