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Title: Automated and Cooperative Vehicle Merging at Highway On-Ramps

Abstract

Recognition of necessities of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) is gaining momentum. CAVs can improve both transportation network efficiency and safety through control algorithms that can harmonically use all existing information to coordinate the vehicles. This paper addresses the problem of optimally coordinating CAVs at merging roadways to achieve smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. Here we present an optimization framework and an analytical closed-form solution that allows online coordination of vehicles at merging zones. The effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed solution is validated through a simulation, and it is shown that coordination of vehicles can significantly reduce both fuel consumption and travel time.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Transportation Research Center (NTRC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1311220
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems; Journal ID: ISSN 1524-9050
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; 42 ENGINEERING; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; Connected and Automated Vehicles; Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communication; Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Communication; Cooperative Driving; Driver Feedback Systems; Vehicles; Merging; Roads; Fuels; Safety

Citation Formats

Rios-Torres, Jackeline, and Malikopoulos, Andreas A. Automated and Cooperative Vehicle Merging at Highway On-Ramps. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1109/TITS.2016.2587582.
Rios-Torres, Jackeline, & Malikopoulos, Andreas A. Automated and Cooperative Vehicle Merging at Highway On-Ramps. United States. doi:10.1109/TITS.2016.2587582.
Rios-Torres, Jackeline, and Malikopoulos, Andreas A. Fri . "Automated and Cooperative Vehicle Merging at Highway On-Ramps". United States. doi:10.1109/TITS.2016.2587582. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1311220.
@article{osti_1311220,
title = {Automated and Cooperative Vehicle Merging at Highway On-Ramps},
author = {Rios-Torres, Jackeline and Malikopoulos, Andreas A.},
abstractNote = {Recognition of necessities of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) is gaining momentum. CAVs can improve both transportation network efficiency and safety through control algorithms that can harmonically use all existing information to coordinate the vehicles. This paper addresses the problem of optimally coordinating CAVs at merging roadways to achieve smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. Here we present an optimization framework and an analytical closed-form solution that allows online coordination of vehicles at merging zones. The effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed solution is validated through a simulation, and it is shown that coordination of vehicles can significantly reduce both fuel consumption and travel time.},
doi = {10.1109/TITS.2016.2587582},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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