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Title: Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

Abstract

This Project aims to satisfy objectives of the DOE’s Water Power Program by completing a system detailed design (SDD) and other important activities in the first phase of a utility-scale grid-connected ocean wave energy demonstration. In early 2012, Columbia Power (CPwr) had determined that further cost and performance optimization was necessary in order to commercialize its StingRAY wave energy converter (WEC). CPwr’s progress toward commercialization, and the requisite technology development path, were focused on transitioning toward a commercial-scale demonstration. This path required significant investment to be successful, and the justification for this investment required improved annual energy production (AEP) and lower capital costs. Engineering solutions were developed to address these technical and cost challenges, incorporated into a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE), and then adapted to form the technical content and statement of project objectives of the resulting Project (DE-EE0005930). Through Project cost-sharing and technical collaboration between DOE and CPwr, and technical collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and other Project partners, we have demonstrated experimentally that these conceptual improvements have merit and made significant progress towards a certified WEC system design at a selected and contracted deployment site at the Wavemore » Energy Test Site (WETS) at the Marine Corps Base in Oahu, HI (MCBH).« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1307881
Report Number(s):
DOE/EE0005930-1
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005930
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; ABS; ANSYS AQWA; Ballast; Certification; Design Basis; Design Load Cases (DLC); DNV; Electric Plant; Hull Structure; Mooring; Permitting; Power Take Off (PTO); Prototype; Relative Capture Width (RCW); SCADA; Statement of Feasibility; Wave Energy Converter (WEC); Wave Energy Test Site (WETS); Wave Tank; WaveDyn

Citation Formats

Rhinefrank, Kenneth, Lamb, Bradford, Prudell, Joseph, Hammagren, Erik, and Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1307881.
Rhinefrank, Kenneth, Lamb, Bradford, Prudell, Joseph, Hammagren, Erik, & Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy. United States. doi:10.2172/1307881.
Rhinefrank, Kenneth, Lamb, Bradford, Prudell, Joseph, Hammagren, Erik, and Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha. 2016. "Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy". United States. doi:10.2172/1307881. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1307881.
@article{osti_1307881,
title = {Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy},
author = {Rhinefrank, Kenneth and Lamb, Bradford and Prudell, Joseph and Hammagren, Erik and Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha},
abstractNote = {This Project aims to satisfy objectives of the DOE’s Water Power Program by completing a system detailed design (SDD) and other important activities in the first phase of a utility-scale grid-connected ocean wave energy demonstration. In early 2012, Columbia Power (CPwr) had determined that further cost and performance optimization was necessary in order to commercialize its StingRAY wave energy converter (WEC). CPwr’s progress toward commercialization, and the requisite technology development path, were focused on transitioning toward a commercial-scale demonstration. This path required significant investment to be successful, and the justification for this investment required improved annual energy production (AEP) and lower capital costs. Engineering solutions were developed to address these technical and cost challenges, incorporated into a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE), and then adapted to form the technical content and statement of project objectives of the resulting Project (DE-EE0005930). Through Project cost-sharing and technical collaboration between DOE and CPwr, and technical collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and other Project partners, we have demonstrated experimentally that these conceptual improvements have merit and made significant progress towards a certified WEC system design at a selected and contracted deployment site at the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) at the Marine Corps Base in Oahu, HI (MCBH).},
doi = {10.2172/1307881},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.
  • Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speedmore » statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.« less
  • Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progress and results for this project which will be used to inform the utility-scale design process, improve cost estimates, accurately forecast energy production and to observe system operation and survivability.
  • A brief history of attempts to use ocean surface wave energy is presented and applicable wave theory is reviewed. Six distinct modes of interaction between a wave and a buoy are defined. These are evaluated by deriving expressions for the maximum power realizable from each and by considering how the use of each would affect buoy functioning. Those modes involving the buoy's reaction to the rise and fall of the ocean surface and the use of the fluctuating pressure field beneath a wave train are selected for further study. A buoy motion analysis supplemented by limited experimentation into linear dampingmore » coefficients is presented in connection with the first of these. Conceptual-level conversion system designs are proposed and compared with other power systems adaptable to buoy use in terms of their energy densities and specific costs and by subjective consideration of their adaptability to long-term unattended use in the ocean. (GRA)« less