skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Comparison of [ 11 C]TZ1964B and [ 18 F]MNI659 for PET imaging brain PDE10A in nonhuman primates

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Missouri
  2. Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Missouri
  3. Molecular NeuroImaging, LLC, New Haven Connecticut
  4. Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Missouri, Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Missouri, Department of Neuroscience, Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Missouri
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1307790
Grant/Contract Number:
DESC0008432; DESC0012737
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Pharmacology Research & Perspectives
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-10-07 10:11:33; Journal ID: ISSN 2052-1707
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Liu, Hui, Jin, Hongjun, Yue, Xuyi, Han, Junbin, Yang, Hao, Flores, Hubert, Su, Yi, Alagille, David, Perlmutter, Joel S., Tamagnan, Gilles, and Tu, Zhude. Comparison of [ 11 C]TZ1964B and [ 18 F]MNI659 for PET imaging brain PDE10A in nonhuman primates. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/prp2.253.
Liu, Hui, Jin, Hongjun, Yue, Xuyi, Han, Junbin, Yang, Hao, Flores, Hubert, Su, Yi, Alagille, David, Perlmutter, Joel S., Tamagnan, Gilles, & Tu, Zhude. Comparison of [ 11 C]TZ1964B and [ 18 F]MNI659 for PET imaging brain PDE10A in nonhuman primates. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/prp2.253.
Liu, Hui, Jin, Hongjun, Yue, Xuyi, Han, Junbin, Yang, Hao, Flores, Hubert, Su, Yi, Alagille, David, Perlmutter, Joel S., Tamagnan, Gilles, and Tu, Zhude. 2016. "Comparison of [ 11 C]TZ1964B and [ 18 F]MNI659 for PET imaging brain PDE10A in nonhuman primates". United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/prp2.253.
@article{osti_1307790,
title = {Comparison of [ 11 C]TZ1964B and [ 18 F]MNI659 for PET imaging brain PDE10A in nonhuman primates},
author = {Liu, Hui and Jin, Hongjun and Yue, Xuyi and Han, Junbin and Yang, Hao and Flores, Hubert and Su, Yi and Alagille, David and Perlmutter, Joel S. and Tamagnan, Gilles and Tu, Zhude},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/prp2.253},
journal = {Pharmacology Research & Perspectives},
number = 5,
volume = 4,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/prp2.253

Save / Share:
  • Technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (({sup 99m}Tc)ECD) is a neutral, lipophilic complex which rapidly crosses the blood-brain barrier. Brain retention and tissue metabolism of ({sup 99m}Tc)ECD is dependent upon the stereochemical configuration of the complex. While both L,L and D,D enantiomers are extracted by the brain, only the L,L but not the D,D form, is metabolized and retained in the monkey brain (4.7% injected dose initially, T 1/2 greater than 24 hr). Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography imaging studies in one monkey indicates {sup 99m}Tc-L,L-ECD to be distributed in a pattern consistent with regional cerebral blood flow for up tomore » 16 hr postinjection. Dual-labeled {sup 99m}Tc-L,L-ECD and ({sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine autoradiography studies performed 1 hr after administration show cortical gray to white matter ratios of both isotopes to be equivalent (approximately 4-5:1). These data suggest that {sup 99m}Tc-L,L-ECD will be useful for the scintigraphic assessment of cerebral perfusion in humans.« less
  • Bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata) were exposed to 0.0, 0.5, or 0.8 ppm ozone for 7, 28, or 90 consecutive days, 8 hours per day. The pulmonary response was evaluated by means of pulmonary function testing, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission microscopy, autoradiography, and morphometry. Pulmonary function values obtained before exposure did not statistically differ from values obtained after exposure. A general trend of increased quasistatic compliance of the lung was observed in both groups of exposed monkeys. Morphologic changes were principally characterized as low-grade chronic respiratory bronchiolitis. Tritiated thymidine labeling and counts of respiratory bronchiolar epithelium demonstrated up tomore » a 37-fold increase in labeling index at 7 days but only a sevenfold increase at 90 days. Differential cell counts demonstrated an increase in the proportion of cuboidal bronchiolar cells constituting the respiratory bronchiolar epithelium. In control monkeys, 60% of the epithelial cells were cuboidal bronchiolar cells. At 90 days of exposure, more than 90% of the respiratory bronchiolar cells were cuboidal in appearance. The cuboidal bronchiolar cell in control monkeys does not appear secretory, but membrane-bound electron-dense secretory granules are present in this cell type from exposed monkeys. Epithelial hyperplasia (increased number of cells per millimeter of airway length) persisted through 90 days of exposure at a level slightly above that present at 7 days.« less
  • To investigate the role of cellular immunodeficiency in recurrent toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis, six Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) with healed toxoplasmic lesions of the retina were immunosuppressed by total lymphoid irradiation. Three months prior to irradiation 30,000 Toxoplasma gondii organisms of the Beverley strain had been inoculated onto the macula of eye in each monkey via a pars plana approach. Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis developed in each animal, and lesions were allowed to heal without treatment. During total lymphoid irradiation animals received 2000 centigrays (cGy) over a 7-week period. Irradiation resulted in an immediate drop in total lymphocyte counts and decreased ability to stimulatemore » lymphocytes by phytohemagglutinin. Weekly ophthalmoscopic examinations following irradiation failed to show evidence of recurrent ocular disease despite persistent immunodeficiency. Four months after irradiation live organisms were reinoculated onto the nasal retina of the same eye in each animal. Retinochoroidal lesions identical to those seen in primary disease developed in five of six animals. Toxoplasma organisms therefore were able to proliferate in ocular tissue following the administration of immunosuppressive therapy. This study fails to support the hypothesis that cellular immunodeficiency alone will initiate recurrent toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis. Results suggest that reactivation of disease from encysted organisms involves factors other than suppression of Toxoplasma proliferation. If reactivation occurs by other mechanisms, however, cellular immunodeficiency then may allow development of extensive disease.« less
  • Placental transfer mechanisms were investigated in pregnant Macaca Fascicularis and Macaca mulatta during the gestational age of 120 to 130 days. These primates underwent an operative procedure that allowed continuous fetal blood sampling. The administration of (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine into the maternal circulation revealed a significant increase of radioactive material in the fetal circulation, indicating an active placental transport mechanism unidirectional to the fetus. When (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine was injected into the fetus, radioactive aromatic amino acids in the maternal circulation increased only slightly over time, resembling a simple diffusion process.