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Title: Fire and Explosion Hazards Expected in a Laboratory

Abstract

Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories, as well as structural improvements made to improve safety and security, to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. This manuscript is the fifth in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents, accidents, and laboratory improvements. In this study, we summarize unsafe practices involving the improper installation of a Gas Chromatograph (GC) at an Iraqi university which, if not corrected, could have resulted in a dangerous fire and explosion. We summarize the identified infractions and highlight lessons learned. By openly sharing the experiences at the university involved, we hope to minimize the possibility of another researcher being injured due to similarly unsafe practices in the future.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1306754
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-118942
400809000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Laboratory Chemical Education, 4(2):35-37
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Rasool, Shireen R., Al-Dahhan, Wedad, Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim, Hussein, Falah, Rodda, Kabrena E., and Yousif, Emad. Fire and Explosion Hazards Expected in a Laboratory. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Rasool, Shireen R., Al-Dahhan, Wedad, Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim, Hussein, Falah, Rodda, Kabrena E., & Yousif, Emad. Fire and Explosion Hazards Expected in a Laboratory. United States.
Rasool, Shireen R., Al-Dahhan, Wedad, Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim, Hussein, Falah, Rodda, Kabrena E., and Yousif, Emad. 2016. "Fire and Explosion Hazards Expected in a Laboratory". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1306754,
title = {Fire and Explosion Hazards Expected in a Laboratory},
author = {Rasool, Shireen R. and Al-Dahhan, Wedad and Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim and Hussein, Falah and Rodda, Kabrena E. and Yousif, Emad},
abstractNote = {Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories, as well as structural improvements made to improve safety and security, to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. This manuscript is the fifth in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents, accidents, and laboratory improvements. In this study, we summarize unsafe practices involving the improper installation of a Gas Chromatograph (GC) at an Iraqi university which, if not corrected, could have resulted in a dangerous fire and explosion. We summarize the identified infractions and highlight lessons learned. By openly sharing the experiences at the university involved, we hope to minimize the possibility of another researcher being injured due to similarly unsafe practices in the future.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Laboratory Chemical Education, 4(2):35-37},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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