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Title: Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation

Abstract

Demanding surface quality requirements for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules motivated the development of a pulsed laser ablation method to reduce or eliminate undesirable surface defects. The pulsed laser ablation technique takes advantage of a full surface (4π) capsule manipulation system working in combination with an optical profiling (confocal) microscope. Based on the defect topography, the material removal rate, the laser pulse energy and its beam profile, a customized laser raster pattern is derived to remove the defect. The pattern is a table of coordinates and number of pulses that dictate how the defect will be vaporized until its height is level with the capsule surface. This paper explains how the raster patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness and how surface roughness after laser ablation is simulated. The simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces. Large defects are reduced to a size regime where a tumble finishing process produces very high quality surfaces devoid of high mode defects. The combined polishing processes of laser ablation and tumble finishing have become routine fabrication steps for National Ignition Facility capsule production.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1305812
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-677154
Journal ID: ISSN 1536-1055; TRN: US1700141
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344; NA0001808
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Fusion Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1536-1055
Publisher:
American Nuclear Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Laser ablation; ICF capsulesl Surface finish

Citation Formats

Alfonso, Noel, Carlson, Lane C., and Bunn, Thomas L. Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.13182/FST15-224.
Alfonso, Noel, Carlson, Lane C., & Bunn, Thomas L. Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation. United States. doi:10.13182/FST15-224.
Alfonso, Noel, Carlson, Lane C., and Bunn, Thomas L. 2016. "Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation". United States. doi:10.13182/FST15-224. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1305812.
@article{osti_1305812,
title = {Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation},
author = {Alfonso, Noel and Carlson, Lane C. and Bunn, Thomas L.},
abstractNote = {Demanding surface quality requirements for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules motivated the development of a pulsed laser ablation method to reduce or eliminate undesirable surface defects. The pulsed laser ablation technique takes advantage of a full surface (4π) capsule manipulation system working in combination with an optical profiling (confocal) microscope. Based on the defect topography, the material removal rate, the laser pulse energy and its beam profile, a customized laser raster pattern is derived to remove the defect. The pattern is a table of coordinates and number of pulses that dictate how the defect will be vaporized until its height is level with the capsule surface. This paper explains how the raster patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness and how surface roughness after laser ablation is simulated. The simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces. Large defects are reduced to a size regime where a tumble finishing process produces very high quality surfaces devoid of high mode defects. The combined polishing processes of laser ablation and tumble finishing have become routine fabrication steps for National Ignition Facility capsule production.},
doi = {10.13182/FST15-224},
journal = {Fusion Science and Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 2works
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