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Title: Advanced Sensor Arrays and Packaging

Abstract

Novel sensor packaging elements were designed, fabricated, and tested in order to facilitate the transition of electrochemical mixed-potential sensors toward commercialization. Of the two designs completed, the first is currently undergoing field trials, taking direct measurements within vehicle exhaust streams, while the second is undergoing preliminary laboratory testing. The sensors’ optimal operating conditions, sensitivity to hydrogen, and long-­term baseline stability were also investigated. The sensing capabilities of lanthanum chromite (La 0.8Sr 0.2CrO 3) and indium-­doped tin oxide (ITO) working electrodes were compared, and the ITO devices were selected for pre-­commercial field trials testing at a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle fueling station in California. Previous data from that fueling station were also analyzed, and the causes of anomalous baseline drift were identified.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Lab. Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program; USDOE Science Undergraduate Lab. Internship (SULI) Program; State of California (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1304789
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-26398
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; Energy Sciences

Citation Formats

Ryter, John Wesley, Romero, Christopher J., Ramaiyan, Kannan, and Brosha, Eric L.. Advanced Sensor Arrays and Packaging. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1304789.
Ryter, John Wesley, Romero, Christopher J., Ramaiyan, Kannan, & Brosha, Eric L.. Advanced Sensor Arrays and Packaging. United States. doi:10.2172/1304789.
Ryter, John Wesley, Romero, Christopher J., Ramaiyan, Kannan, and Brosha, Eric L.. 2016. "Advanced Sensor Arrays and Packaging". United States. doi:10.2172/1304789. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1304789.
@article{osti_1304789,
title = {Advanced Sensor Arrays and Packaging},
author = {Ryter, John Wesley and Romero, Christopher J. and Ramaiyan, Kannan and Brosha, Eric L.},
abstractNote = {Novel sensor packaging elements were designed, fabricated, and tested in order to facilitate the transition of electrochemical mixed-potential sensors toward commercialization. Of the two designs completed, the first is currently undergoing field trials, taking direct measurements within vehicle exhaust streams, while the second is undergoing preliminary laboratory testing. The sensors’ optimal operating conditions, sensitivity to hydrogen, and long-­term baseline stability were also investigated. The sensing capabilities of lanthanum chromite (La0.8Sr0.2CrO3) and indium-­doped tin oxide (ITO) working electrodes were compared, and the ITO devices were selected for pre-­commercial field trials testing at a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle fueling station in California. Previous data from that fueling station were also analyzed, and the causes of anomalous baseline drift were identified.},
doi = {10.2172/1304789},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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