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Title: Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV

Abstract

Over the course of summer 2016, the effects of several computational modeling assumptions with respect to the Godiva IV reactor were examined. The majority of these assumptions pertained to modeling errors existing in the control rods and burst rod. The Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MCNP, was used to investigate these modeling changes, primarily by comparing them to that of the original input deck specifications.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1304745
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-26194
TRN: US1601791
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; GODIVA REACTOR; NEUTRON TRANSPORT THEORY; MONTE CARLO METHOD; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CONTROL ELEMENTS; ERRORS; SPECIFICATIONS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Kirkland, Alexander Matthew, and Jaegers, Peter James. Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1304745.
Kirkland, Alexander Matthew, & Jaegers, Peter James. Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV. United States. doi:10.2172/1304745.
Kirkland, Alexander Matthew, and Jaegers, Peter James. 2016. "Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV". United States. doi:10.2172/1304745. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1304745.
@article{osti_1304745,
title = {Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV},
author = {Kirkland, Alexander Matthew and Jaegers, Peter James},
abstractNote = {Over the course of summer 2016, the effects of several computational modeling assumptions with respect to the Godiva IV reactor were examined. The majority of these assumptions pertained to modeling errors existing in the control rods and burst rod. The Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MCNP, was used to investigate these modeling changes, primarily by comparing them to that of the original input deck specifications.},
doi = {10.2172/1304745},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formationmore » was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.« less
  • The dynamic computer model developed to simulate GODIVA-IV prompt bursts adequately predicts the magnitude of power bursts. Also, it demonstrates the characteristic features of prompt bursts in metal assemblies, such as the change in shape of power pulses and the ringing of fuel surfaces at the onset of inertial effects. The model will be used to test more sophisticated reactivity feedback coefficients and neutronic-hydrodynamic coupling schemes. It will also be used for a more detailed analysis of inertial effects.
  • Godiva is an unshielded, pulsed nuclear reactor, used to produce bursts of neutrons and gamma rays for irradiating test samples. The Godiva reactor is part of the TA-18 Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Godiva reactor is to be moved to the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site, northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Bursts of ionizing radiation from Godiva have been found to produce radio waves and electrical interference in circuits and electrical equipment (e.g., alarm systems, interlocks, recording devices) near Godiva. Safety and security concerns regarding Godiva at the DAF are: (1) Can Godiva pulsesmore » induce detonators elsewhere in the DAF to explode?, (2) What is the expected strength of the electrical signal from Godiva elsewhere in the DAF? (3) Will Godiva pulses trigger security alarms, requiring additional administrative controls? This report addresses these issues, and describes a brief set of electrical measurements intended to verify that electromagnetic emissions from Godiva are unchanged by its relocation, and below a threshold of safety for detonators that are outside the actual room Godiva resides in. The following points will be described: the nature of Godiva electrical emissions, predicted electric field at a given distance, electromagnetic frequency, safety threshold for detonators, recommended ''stay out'' zone around Godiva for detonators, and recommended measurements to be made once Godiva has been installed at DAF.« less