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Title: DOES A SAFETY CLASS ACTIVE VENTILATION SYSTEM SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCE SAFETY?

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1304693
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-2280
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: EFCOG, SAFETY ANALYSIS WORKING GROUP (SAWG) ANNUAL WORKSHOP ; 200705 ; IDAHO FALLS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

DALLMAN, ROBERT J., MCCLURE, PATRICK R., and SASSER, MARION K. DOES A SAFETY CLASS ACTIVE VENTILATION SYSTEM SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCE SAFETY?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
DALLMAN, ROBERT J., MCCLURE, PATRICK R., & SASSER, MARION K. DOES A SAFETY CLASS ACTIVE VENTILATION SYSTEM SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCE SAFETY?. United States.
DALLMAN, ROBERT J., MCCLURE, PATRICK R., and SASSER, MARION K. Thu . "DOES A SAFETY CLASS ACTIVE VENTILATION SYSTEM SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCE SAFETY?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1304693.
@article{osti_1304693,
title = {DOES A SAFETY CLASS ACTIVE VENTILATION SYSTEM SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCE SAFETY?},
author = {DALLMAN, ROBERT J. and MCCLURE, PATRICK R. and SASSER, MARION K.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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