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Title: Battery Pack Thermal Design

Abstract

This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1304580
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5400-66960
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 16th Annual Advanced Automotive Battery Conference, 14-17 June 2016, Detroit, Michigan
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; lithium ion batteries; thermal design; thermal management system; internal short circuit

Citation Formats

Pesaran, Ahmad. Battery Pack Thermal Design. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Pesaran, Ahmad. Battery Pack Thermal Design. United States.
Pesaran, Ahmad. Tue . "Battery Pack Thermal Design". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1304580.
@article{osti_1304580,
title = {Battery Pack Thermal Design},
author = {Pesaran, Ahmad},
abstractNote = {This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 14 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Jun 14 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
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