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Title: Status and Prognosis of Future-Generation Photoconversion to Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels

Abstract

Professor Arthur J. Nozik has fought for, inspired, cajoled, and led a generation of scientists in the pursuit of the science of solar photoconversion, photovoltaics, and solar fuels. On March 25th, 2016, a group of former colleagues, co-workers, and friends met to recognize Prof. Nozik's contribution to their work, excellence in science, and life. While the event was a celebration of his many scientific contributions, it served mostly to honor his leadership and vision.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1304578
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5900-66797
Journal ID: ISSN 2380-8195
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Energy Letters; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; solar fuels; solar energy conversion

Citation Formats

Beard, Matthew C., Blackburn, Jeffrey L., Johnson, Justin C., and Rumbles, Garry. Status and Prognosis of Future-Generation Photoconversion to Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00204.
Beard, Matthew C., Blackburn, Jeffrey L., Johnson, Justin C., & Rumbles, Garry. Status and Prognosis of Future-Generation Photoconversion to Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels. United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00204.
Beard, Matthew C., Blackburn, Jeffrey L., Johnson, Justin C., and Rumbles, Garry. 2016. "Status and Prognosis of Future-Generation Photoconversion to Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels". United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00204.
@article{osti_1304578,
title = {Status and Prognosis of Future-Generation Photoconversion to Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels},
author = {Beard, Matthew C. and Blackburn, Jeffrey L. and Johnson, Justin C. and Rumbles, Garry},
abstractNote = {Professor Arthur J. Nozik has fought for, inspired, cajoled, and led a generation of scientists in the pursuit of the science of solar photoconversion, photovoltaics, and solar fuels. On March 25th, 2016, a group of former colleagues, co-workers, and friends met to recognize Prof. Nozik's contribution to their work, excellence in science, and life. While the event was a celebration of his many scientific contributions, it served mostly to honor his leadership and vision.},
doi = {10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00204},
journal = {ACS Energy Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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