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Title: Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles

Abstract

Using the Langevin dynamics method and a coarse-grained model, we have researched the formation of vesicles by hydrophobic polymers consisting of periodically placed zwitterion side groups in dilute salt-free aqueous solutions. The zwitterions, being permanent charge dipoles, provide long-range electrostatic correlations which are interfered by the conformational entropy of the polymer. Our simulations are geared towards gaining conceptual understanding in these correlated dipolar systems, where theoretical calculations are at present formidable. A competition between hydrophobic interactions and dipole-dipole interactions leads to a series of self-assembled structures. As the spacing d between the successive zwitterion side groups decreases, single chains undergo globule → disk → worm-like structures. We have calculated the Flory-Huggins χ parameter for these systems in terms of d and monitored the radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius, spatial correlations among hydrophobic and dipole monomers, and dipole-dipole orientational correlation functions. During the subsequent stages of self-assembly, these structures lead to larger globules and vesicles as d is decreased up to a threshold value, below which no large scale morphology forms. Finally the vesicles form via a polynucleation mechanism whereby disk-like structures form first, followed by their subsequent merger.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1302923
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 145; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Mahalik, Jyoti P., and Muthukumar, Murugappan. Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960774.
Mahalik, Jyoti P., & Muthukumar, Murugappan. Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960774.
Mahalik, Jyoti P., and Muthukumar, Murugappan. Fri . "Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960774. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1302923.
@article{osti_1302923,
title = {Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles},
author = {Mahalik, Jyoti P. and Muthukumar, Murugappan},
abstractNote = {Using the Langevin dynamics method and a coarse-grained model, we have researched the formation of vesicles by hydrophobic polymers consisting of periodically placed zwitterion side groups in dilute salt-free aqueous solutions. The zwitterions, being permanent charge dipoles, provide long-range electrostatic correlations which are interfered by the conformational entropy of the polymer. Our simulations are geared towards gaining conceptual understanding in these correlated dipolar systems, where theoretical calculations are at present formidable. A competition between hydrophobic interactions and dipole-dipole interactions leads to a series of self-assembled structures. As the spacing d between the successive zwitterion side groups decreases, single chains undergo globule → disk → worm-like structures. We have calculated the Flory-Huggins χ parameter for these systems in terms of d and monitored the radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius, spatial correlations among hydrophobic and dipole monomers, and dipole-dipole orientational correlation functions. During the subsequent stages of self-assembly, these structures lead to larger globules and vesicles as d is decreased up to a threshold value, below which no large scale morphology forms. Finally the vesicles form via a polynucleation mechanism whereby disk-like structures form first, followed by their subsequent merger.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960774},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 7,
volume = 145,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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