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Title: Impact of Micro-to Meso-scale Fractures on Sealing Behavior of Argillaceous Cap Rocks For CO 2 Sequestration

Abstract

This multi-disciplinary project evaluated seal lithologies for the safety and security of long-term geosequestration of CO 2. We used integrated studies to provide qualitative risk for potential seal failure; we integrated data sets from outcrop, core, geochemical analysis, rock failure properties from mechanical testing, geophysical wireline log analysis, and geomechanical modeling to understand the effects of lithologic heterogeneity and changing mechanical properties have on the mechanical properties of the seal. The objectives of this study were to characterize cap rock seals using natural field analogs, available drillhole logging data and whole-rock core, geochemical and isotopic analyses. Rock deformation experiments were carried out on collected samples to develop better models of risk estimation for potential cap rock seal failure. We also sampled variably faulted and fractured cap rocks to examine the impacts of mineralization and/or alteration on the mechanical properties. We compared CO 2 reacted systems to non-CO 2 reacted seal rock types to determine response of each to increased pore fluid pressures and potential for the creation of unintentional hydrofractures at depth.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1302338
Report Number(s):
USU-DOE-0004991-1
DOE Contract Number:
SC0004991
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; CO2; seal; integrity; bypass; storage

Citation Formats

Evans, James. Impact of Micro-to Meso-scale Fractures on Sealing Behavior of Argillaceous Cap Rocks For CO2 Sequestration. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1302338.
Evans, James. Impact of Micro-to Meso-scale Fractures on Sealing Behavior of Argillaceous Cap Rocks For CO2 Sequestration. United States. doi:10.2172/1302338.
Evans, James. 2016. "Impact of Micro-to Meso-scale Fractures on Sealing Behavior of Argillaceous Cap Rocks For CO2 Sequestration". United States. doi:10.2172/1302338. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1302338.
@article{osti_1302338,
title = {Impact of Micro-to Meso-scale Fractures on Sealing Behavior of Argillaceous Cap Rocks For CO2 Sequestration},
author = {Evans, James},
abstractNote = {This multi-disciplinary project evaluated seal lithologies for the safety and security of long-term geosequestration of CO2. We used integrated studies to provide qualitative risk for potential seal failure; we integrated data sets from outcrop, core, geochemical analysis, rock failure properties from mechanical testing, geophysical wireline log analysis, and geomechanical modeling to understand the effects of lithologic heterogeneity and changing mechanical properties have on the mechanical properties of the seal. The objectives of this study were to characterize cap rock seals using natural field analogs, available drillhole logging data and whole-rock core, geochemical and isotopic analyses. Rock deformation experiments were carried out on collected samples to develop better models of risk estimation for potential cap rock seal failure. We also sampled variably faulted and fractured cap rocks to examine the impacts of mineralization and/or alteration on the mechanical properties. We compared CO2 reacted systems to non-CO2 reacted seal rock types to determine response of each to increased pore fluid pressures and potential for the creation of unintentional hydrofractures at depth.},
doi = {10.2172/1302338},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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