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Title: Preface

Abstract

Preface to the special issue of Thin Solid Films covering the 9th International Symposium on Transparent Oxide Thin Films for Electronics and Optics (TOEO-9).

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1301815
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5F00-66973
Journal ID: ISSN 0040-6090
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Thin Solid Films; Journal Volume: 614; Journal Issue: PB
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; transparent conducting oxide materials; TCO; carrier transport

Citation Formats

Ginley, David, Granqvist, Claes-G., Kiriakidis, George, Klein, Andreas, Kamiya, Toshio, and Hosono, Hideo. Preface. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2016.07.054.
Ginley, David, Granqvist, Claes-G., Kiriakidis, George, Klein, Andreas, Kamiya, Toshio, & Hosono, Hideo. Preface. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2016.07.054.
Ginley, David, Granqvist, Claes-G., Kiriakidis, George, Klein, Andreas, Kamiya, Toshio, and Hosono, Hideo. 2016. "Preface". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2016.07.054.
@article{osti_1301815,
title = {Preface},
author = {Ginley, David and Granqvist, Claes-G. and Kiriakidis, George and Klein, Andreas and Kamiya, Toshio and Hosono, Hideo},
abstractNote = {Preface to the special issue of Thin Solid Films covering the 9th International Symposium on Transparent Oxide Thin Films for Electronics and Optics (TOEO-9).},
doi = {10.1016/j.tsf.2016.07.054},
journal = {Thin Solid Films},
number = PB,
volume = 614,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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