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Title: Evaluating the influence of life-history characteristics on genetic structure: a comparison of small mammals inhabiting complex agricultural landscapes

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, PO Drawer E Aiken South Carolina 29802
  2. Biosciences Department, Minnesota State University Moorhead, 1104 7th Ave Moorhead Minnesota 56563
  3. Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, 715 W. State Street West Lafayette Indiana 47907
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
1299428
Grant/Contract Number:
FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Ecology and Evolution
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 17; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-09-09 22:12:23; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-7758
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kierepka, Elizabeth M., Anderson, Sara J., Swihart, Robert K., and Rhodes, Jr, Olin E.. Evaluating the influence of life-history characteristics on genetic structure: a comparison of small mammals inhabiting complex agricultural landscapes. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/ece3.2269.
Kierepka, Elizabeth M., Anderson, Sara J., Swihart, Robert K., & Rhodes, Jr, Olin E.. Evaluating the influence of life-history characteristics on genetic structure: a comparison of small mammals inhabiting complex agricultural landscapes. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/ece3.2269.
Kierepka, Elizabeth M., Anderson, Sara J., Swihart, Robert K., and Rhodes, Jr, Olin E.. 2016. "Evaluating the influence of life-history characteristics on genetic structure: a comparison of small mammals inhabiting complex agricultural landscapes". United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/ece3.2269.
@article{osti_1299428,
title = {Evaluating the influence of life-history characteristics on genetic structure: a comparison of small mammals inhabiting complex agricultural landscapes},
author = {Kierepka, Elizabeth M. and Anderson, Sara J. and Swihart, Robert K. and Rhodes, Jr, Olin E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/ece3.2269},
journal = {Ecology and Evolution},
number = 17,
volume = 6,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/ece3.2269

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