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Title: Self-Assembling Biological Springs Force Transducers on the Micron Nanoscale

Abstract

In this project, we are developing a new system for measuring forces within and between nanoscale biological molecules based on mesoscopic springs made of cholesterol helical ribbons. These ribbons self-assemble in a wide variety of complex fluids containing sterol, a mixture of surfactants and water [1] and have spring constants in the range from 0.5 to 500 pN/nm [2-4]. By the end of this project, we have demonstrated that the cholesterol helical ribbons can be used for measuring forces between biological objects and for mapping the strain fields in hydrogels.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Chicago Operations Office (CO)
OSTI Identifier:
1299203
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-04ER46149
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Benedek, George, and Casparay, Alfred H. Self-Assembling Biological Springs Force Transducers on the Micron Nanoscale. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1299203.
Benedek, George, & Casparay, Alfred H. Self-Assembling Biological Springs Force Transducers on the Micron Nanoscale. United States. doi:10.2172/1299203.
Benedek, George, and Casparay, Alfred H. Fri . "Self-Assembling Biological Springs Force Transducers on the Micron Nanoscale". United States. doi:10.2172/1299203. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1299203.
@article{osti_1299203,
title = {Self-Assembling Biological Springs Force Transducers on the Micron Nanoscale},
author = {Benedek, George and Casparay, Alfred H.},
abstractNote = {In this project, we are developing a new system for measuring forces within and between nanoscale biological molecules based on mesoscopic springs made of cholesterol helical ribbons. These ribbons self-assemble in a wide variety of complex fluids containing sterol, a mixture of surfactants and water [1] and have spring constants in the range from 0.5 to 500 pN/nm [2-4]. By the end of this project, we have demonstrated that the cholesterol helical ribbons can be used for measuring forces between biological objects and for mapping the strain fields in hydrogels.},
doi = {10.2172/1299203},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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