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Title: GTM-1

Abstract

GTM-1 was developed for the assessment of radionuclide transport by the ground-water through geoligic formations whose properties can change along the pathway. The program was developed for specific use within Probabilistic System Assessment (PSA) Monte Carlo codes.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
OECD Nuclear Energy Agency
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1299201
Report Number(s):
GTM-1; 002328MNFRM00
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
002328
Software Package Contents:
Media Directory; Software Abstract; 1 CD-ROM
Software CPU:
MNFRM
Source Code Available:
No
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Herrero, P. Prado. GTM-1. Computer software. Vers. 00. USDOE. 8 Feb. 2007. Web.
Herrero, P. Prado. (2007, February 8). GTM-1 (Version 00) [Computer software].
Herrero, P. Prado. GTM-1. Computer software. Version 00. February 8, 2007.
@misc{osti_1299201,
title = {GTM-1, Version 00},
author = {Herrero, P. Prado},
abstractNote = {GTM-1 was developed for the assessment of radionuclide transport by the ground-water through geoligic formations whose properties can change along the pathway. The program was developed for specific use within Probabilistic System Assessment (PSA) Monte Carlo codes.},
doi = {},
year = {Thu Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2007},
note =
}

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