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Title: N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
FOREIGN
OSTI Identifier:
1298278
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Scientific Reports; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Carcelli, Mauro, Rogolino, Dominga, Gatti, Anna, De Luca, Laura, Sechi, Mario, Kumar, Gyanendra, White, Stephen W., Stevaert, Annelies, and Naesens, Lieve. N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/srep31500.
Carcelli, Mauro, Rogolino, Dominga, Gatti, Anna, De Luca, Laura, Sechi, Mario, Kumar, Gyanendra, White, Stephen W., Stevaert, Annelies, & Naesens, Lieve. N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes. United States. doi:10.1038/srep31500.
Carcelli, Mauro, Rogolino, Dominga, Gatti, Anna, De Luca, Laura, Sechi, Mario, Kumar, Gyanendra, White, Stephen W., Stevaert, Annelies, and Naesens, Lieve. 2016. "N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes". United States. doi:10.1038/srep31500.
@article{osti_1298278,
title = {N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes},
author = {Carcelli, Mauro and Rogolino, Dominga and Gatti, Anna and De Luca, Laura and Sechi, Mario and Kumar, Gyanendra and White, Stephen W. and Stevaert, Annelies and Naesens, Lieve},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1038/srep31500},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 2016,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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