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Title: LANL ASC Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation: Next-Generation Code project (NGC)*

Abstract

This report describes the Next-Generation Code project, the problem it hopes to address, technologies used, risks and challenges, and how the plan will develop.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1298220
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-25966
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Daniel, David John, and Hungerford, Aimee L. LANL ASC Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation: Next-Generation Code project (NGC)*. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1298220.
Daniel, David John, & Hungerford, Aimee L. LANL ASC Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation: Next-Generation Code project (NGC)*. United States. doi:10.2172/1298220.
Daniel, David John, and Hungerford, Aimee L. 2016. "LANL ASC Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation: Next-Generation Code project (NGC)*". United States. doi:10.2172/1298220. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1298220.
@article{osti_1298220,
title = {LANL ASC Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation: Next-Generation Code project (NGC)*},
author = {Daniel, David John and Hungerford, Aimee L.},
abstractNote = {This report describes the Next-Generation Code project, the problem it hopes to address, technologies used, risks and challenges, and how the plan will develop.},
doi = {10.2172/1298220},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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