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Title: Final Report: Investigations of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Processes

Abstract

This project supported the principle investigator’s work on a number of studies regarding mixed-phase clouds and in various related collaborations with ARM and related scientists. This project has contributed to numerous publications and conference/meeting presentations.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1298132
Report Number(s):
DOE-CUB-7005
Proposal 0510.11.0821B
DOE Contract Number:
SC0007005
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Shupe, Matthew. Final Report: Investigations of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Processes. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1298132.
Shupe, Matthew. Final Report: Investigations of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Processes. United States. doi:10.2172/1298132.
Shupe, Matthew. 2016. "Final Report: Investigations of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Processes". United States. doi:10.2172/1298132. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1298132.
@article{osti_1298132,
title = {Final Report: Investigations of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Processes},
author = {Shupe, Matthew},
abstractNote = {This project supported the principle investigator’s work on a number of studies regarding mixed-phase clouds and in various related collaborations with ARM and related scientists. This project has contributed to numerous publications and conference/meeting presentations.},
doi = {10.2172/1298132},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • This final report summarizes the major accomplishments and products resulting from a three-year grant funded by the DOE, Office of Science, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program titled: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds. Accomplishments are listed under the following subcategories: Mixed-phase cloud retrieval method development; Mixed-phase cloud characterization; ARM mixed-phase cloud retrieval review; and New ARM MICROBASE product. In addition, lists are provided of service to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, data products provided to the broader research community, and publications resulting from this grant.
  • The overall purpose of this research was to exploit measurements in clouds sampled during several field programs, especially from experiments in tropical regions, in a four-component study to develop and validate cloud parameterizations for general circulation models, emphasizing ice clouds. The components were: (1) parameterization of basic properties of mid- and upper-tropospheric clouds, such as condensed water content, primarily with respect to cirrus from tropical areas; (2) the second component was to develop parameterizations which express cloud radiative properties in terms of basic cloud microphysical properties, dealing primarily with tropical oceanic cirrus clouds and continental thunderstorm anvils, but also includingmore » altocumulus clouds; (3) the third component was to validate the parameterizations through use of ground-based measurements calibrated using existing and planned in-situ measurements of cloud microphysical properties and bulk radiative properties, as well as time-resolved data collected over extended periods of time; (4) the fourth component was to implement the parameterizations in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM) II or in the NOAA-GFDL model (by L. Donner GFDL) and to perform sensitivity studies.« less
  • The dual objectives of this project were improving our basic understanding of processes that control cirrus microphysical properties and improvement of the representation of these processes in the parameterizations. A major effort in the proposed research was to integrate, calibrate, and better understand the uncertainties in all of these measurements.
  • OAK-B135 The rate of climate change in polar regions is now felt to be a harbinger of possible global warming. Long-lived, relatively thin stratus clouds play a predominant role in transmitting solar radiation and trapping long wave radiation emitted from open water and melt ponds. In situ measurements of microphysical and radiative properties of Arctic and Antarctic stratus clouds are needed to validate retrievals from remote measurements and simulations using numerical models. While research aircraft can collect comprehensive microphysical and radiative data in clouds, the duration of these aircraft is relatively short (up to about 12 hours). During the coursemore » of the Phase II research, a tethered balloon system was developed that supports miniaturized meteorological, microphysical and radiation sensors that can collect data in stratus clouds for days at a time. The tethered balloon system uses a 43 cubic meter balloon to loft a 17 kg sensor package to altitudes u p to 2 km. Power is supplied to the instrument package via two copper conductors in the custom tether. Meteorological, microphysical and radiation data are recorded by the sensor package. Meteorological measurements include pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Radiation measurements are made using a 4-pi radiometer that measures actinic flux at 500 and 800 nm. Position is recorded using a GPS receiver. Microphysical data are obtained using a miniaturized version of an airborne cloud particle imager (CPI). The miniaturized CPI measures the size distribution of water drops and ice crystals from 9 microns to 1.4 mm. Data are recorded onboard the sensor package and also telemetered via a 802.11b wireless communications link. Command signals can also be sent to the computer in the sensor package via the wireless link. In the event of a broken tether, a GMRS radio link to the balloon package is used to heat a wire that burns 15 cm opening in the top of the balloon. The balloon and sensor package slowly descends to the ground and a radio tracking beacon is activated to locate the balloon and sensor package. The tethered balloon system was deployed in upslope clouds at the Smokey Hills Bombing Range in western Kansas and at Ft. Carson Air Force Base near Colorado Springs, Colorado. Both of these areas are FAA Restricted Airspace up to FL180 (18,000 ft MSL) so that the tethered balloon could be flown to its maximum height without violating FAA regulations. Because the feasibility field programs took place at the very end of the research period covered by this DOE grant, a detailed analysis of the results are beyond the scope of this report. However, examples of water drops and ice crystals recorded by the CPI demonstrated the feasibility of the balloon and sensor package. Based on our initial analysis of results from the feasibility field deployments, we have determined that the tethered balloon system is capable of making long -term measurements of meteorological, microphysical and radiation properties of polar stratus clouds up to a height of about 2 km. However, further field trials should be conducted before deploying the system in a full-up field campaign.« less