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Title: Final Technical Report - Polymeric Multilayer Infrared Reflecting Mirrors

Abstract

The goal of this project was to develop a clear, polymeric, multilayer film with an expanded infrared (IR) reflection band which would allow improved rejection of incident IR energy. The IR reflection band is covering the region from about 850 nm to 1830 nm. This film is essentially clear and colorless in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectra (visible light transmission of about 89%) while reflecting 90-95% of the IR energy over the portion of the spectra indicated above. This film has a nominal thickness of 3 mils, is polymeric in nature (contains no metals, metal oxides, or other material types) and is essentially clear in appearance This film can then be used as a component of other products such as a solar window film, an IR reflecting interlayer for laminated glass, a heat rejecting skylight film, a base film for daylight redirecting products, a greenhouse film, and many more applications. One of the main strengths of this product is that because it is a standalone IR rejecting film, it can be incorporated and retrofitted into many applications that desire or require the transmission of visible light, but want to block other portions of the solar spectra, especially themore » IR portion. Many of the applications exist in the window glazing product area where this film can provide for substantial energy improvements in applications where visible light is desired.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. 3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1297913
Report Number(s):
DOE-3M-03837
DOE Contract Number:
EE0003837
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; IR; multi-layer film; expanded infrared reflection band; solar window film; heat rejecting skylight film; daylight redirecting product; block solar spectra

Citation Formats

Reed, John. Final Technical Report - Polymeric Multilayer Infrared Reflecting Mirrors. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1297913.
Reed, John. Final Technical Report - Polymeric Multilayer Infrared Reflecting Mirrors. United States. doi:10.2172/1297913.
Reed, John. 2016. "Final Technical Report - Polymeric Multilayer Infrared Reflecting Mirrors". United States. doi:10.2172/1297913. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1297913.
@article{osti_1297913,
title = {Final Technical Report - Polymeric Multilayer Infrared Reflecting Mirrors},
author = {Reed, John},
abstractNote = {The goal of this project was to develop a clear, polymeric, multilayer film with an expanded infrared (IR) reflection band which would allow improved rejection of incident IR energy. The IR reflection band is covering the region from about 850 nm to 1830 nm. This film is essentially clear and colorless in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectra (visible light transmission of about 89%) while reflecting 90-95% of the IR energy over the portion of the spectra indicated above. This film has a nominal thickness of 3 mils, is polymeric in nature (contains no metals, metal oxides, or other material types) and is essentially clear in appearance This film can then be used as a component of other products such as a solar window film, an IR reflecting interlayer for laminated glass, a heat rejecting skylight film, a base film for daylight redirecting products, a greenhouse film, and many more applications. One of the main strengths of this product is that because it is a standalone IR rejecting film, it can be incorporated and retrofitted into many applications that desire or require the transmission of visible light, but want to block other portions of the solar spectra, especially the IR portion. Many of the applications exist in the window glazing product area where this film can provide for substantial energy improvements in applications where visible light is desired.},
doi = {10.2172/1297913},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • 3M is currently developing silvered polymeric mirror reflectors as low-cost replacements for glass mirrors in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This effort is focused on development of reflectors comprising both metallized polymeric mirror films based on improved versions of ECP-305+ or other durable mirror film concepts and appropriate mechanically robust substrates. The objectives for this project are to reduce the system capital and operating costs and to lower the levelized cost of energy for CSP installations. The development of mirror reflectors involves work on both full reflectors and mirror films with and without coatings. Mirror reflectors must meet rigid opticalmore » specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. Mirror films must demonstrate long-term durability and maintain high reflectivity. 3M would like to augment internal capabilities to validate product performance with methods and tools developed at NREL to address these areas.« less
  • A radiation effects experimental program was performed, in which second surface mirror type thermal control coatings were exposed to ultraviolet radiation, electrons, and protons simultaneously. Stability was assessed by making periodic spectral reflectance measurements in situ (and in air after testing for comparison). Solar absorption coefficients were derived by computer. Many of the exposed materials showed large amounts of degradation in reflectance absorptance, principally due to the electron exposure. A series of tests was conducted, leading to the identification of a modified second surface mirror that shows considerable improvement and promise for stability during thermal control applications in a chargedmore » particle space radiation environment. (auth)« less
  • A normal-incidence multilayer mirror telescope was designed, fabricated, and tested. The telescope consisted of a primary mirror and a secondary mirror in a Cassegrain optical configuration. The mirrors had multilayer coatings that efficiently reflected the soft x-ray radiation in a narrow bandpass centered at a wavelength of 48 {angstrom}. The telescope was taken to the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) on October 28, 1996. The telescope was mounted in a TIM instrument module on the OMEGA target chamber. The focusing and alignment of the mirrors were checked and optimized. Images were recorded on x-ray film on October 30. Images weremore » recorded on a gated framing camera on October 31 and November 1. On each laser shot, hard x-ray images were recorded by a pinhole camera and a gated framing camera. The soft and hard x-ray images were returned to NRL for analysis. The images were digitized and compared. The major result of the study was that the soft x-ray emission from plasmas generated by 6 to 8 overlapping OMEGA beams is quite uniform, even for the case when beam smoothing techniques were not implemented. This implies that the soft x-ray emission can be used for backlighter applications and for the study of absorption by CH foils in the 48 {angstrom} wavelength region, at slightly longer wavelengths than the carbon K absorption edge where carbon is relatively transmissive. These backlighter techniques are now being implemented at LLE.« less
  • Reflection-absorbance spectroscopy has been used to obtain analytical information on samples of polymer/metal multilayer stacks subjected to degradative factors. The capabilities of the apparatus are summarized and representative data from initial studies are presented. (LEW)