skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Interface area transport of monodispersed spherical particulates

Abstract

We present an interface area transport model required in tracking of mass, momentum, and energy exchange between dispersed and background materials. The basic transport equation has been rigorously derived from the volume fraction evolution equation. Interface area changes due to mass transport and local compression/expansion are included. The model is then simplified for the case in which the dispersed phase is composed of spheres of locally uniform size. A procedure for calculating advective flux with interface reconstruction has been suggested.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1296695
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-26116
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Chang, Chong H. Interface area transport of monodispersed spherical particulates. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1296695.
Chang, Chong H. Interface area transport of monodispersed spherical particulates. United States. doi:10.2172/1296695.
Chang, Chong H. Fri . "Interface area transport of monodispersed spherical particulates". United States. doi:10.2172/1296695. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1296695.
@article{osti_1296695,
title = {Interface area transport of monodispersed spherical particulates},
author = {Chang, Chong H.},
abstractNote = {We present an interface area transport model required in tracking of mass, momentum, and energy exchange between dispersed and background materials. The basic transport equation has been rigorously derived from the volume fraction evolution equation. Interface area changes due to mass transport and local compression/expansion are included. The model is then simplified for the case in which the dispersed phase is composed of spheres of locally uniform size. A procedure for calculating advective flux with interface reconstruction has been suggested.},
doi = {10.2172/1296695},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Yttrium hydroxy-carbonate particles were prepared by decomposition of urea in yttrium nitrate solutions. The nucleation and growth were studied in silica-seeded and unseeded systems. Precipitation took place only under neutral conditions. In unseeded systems, homogeneous nucleation yielded 3 x 10/sup 10/ nucleicm/sup 3/ while in seeded precipitation enough nuclei were produced to bring the total number of particles to 4 x 10/sup 10/cm/sup 3/. Systems containing at least 4 x 10/sup 10/ seedscm/sup 3/ underwent pure heterogeneous precipitation onto the existing seeds. Two diffusion-controlled growth models and the diffusion chronomal analysis were applied to the data of growth rate. Resultsmore » confirmed the diffusion-controlled particle growth mechanism. Electron diffraction showed the particles to be crystalline. Electrophoresis showed a charge reversal from positive to negative with pH, with an isoelectric point of about 7.4. The chemical composition of the powders was determined to be Y(OH)CO/sub 3/ . H/sub 2/O. Stability of aqueous suspensions was studied as a function of pH. 74 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs« less
  • One of the main objectives in our task is to develop a way to make uniform low-density-materials. The current method being studied is by means of deep filtration. We are trying to deposit sub-micron particulates uniformly in a porous medium. The behavior of depositing particulates inside a porous medium is a very complicated phenomenon. It varies with the structure of the porous medium, the fluid dynamics, the particulate properties, etc. All these factors will influence the balance between the mass transfer and the deposition kinetics in the system. It is a desire to develop some computer models that will guidemore » us in the right direction for the development of various systems. This report is devoted to the most basic and the simplest model developed for this purpose. The model presented deals with the deposition behavior of uniform spherical particulates inside a matrix composed of uniform hollow cylinders. We have limited ourselves to the case of 100% sticking coefficient (or capture probability). This specific condition will make the whole system become mainly mass transfer controlled. The basic mass transfer calculations are based on the theoretical solution for the diffusion of aerosol in a laminar pipe flow. The results of the model suggest that it is an intrinsic phenomenon to have much heavier deposition at the upstream entrance area. Therefore, in order to accomplish a uniform deposition, special modifications may be required. A listing of the computer code is included in appendices.« less
  • The physical oceanographic objectives of SEEP are to identify possible pathways of exchange of particulate matter between the shelf and continental slope as these processes relate to the biological objectives of the determination of the processes governing the production and fate of biogenic particles and the chemical objectives of partitioning the natural and containment chemical species between dissolved and particulate phases. During the present funding period, research activities have been directed towards: publishing the results of SEEP-I; publishing further results from NCSU's South Atlantic Bight studies; designing and constructing four cages which will house the RD-Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers includingmore » one to be used in SEEP-II; determining the temporal and spatial scales of physical processes observed during Phase I of SEEP-II in preparation for finalizing the mooring positions and sampling intervals for SEEP-II.« less
  • During the present funding period, research activities at NCSU have been directed towards: publishing the results of SEEP-I; publishing further results from NCSU`s South Atlantic Bight studies; designing and constructing four cages which house the 3 NCSU and 1 BNL RD-Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers used successfully in SEEP-II, calibrating all current meters, transmissometers, thermister chains and conductivity pressure and temperature sensors for SEEP-II phases 2 and 3; determining the temporal and spatial scales of physical processes observed during phase 1 of SEEP-II in preparation for finalizing the mooring positions and sampling intervals for SEEP-II; shipping all NCSU gear to themore » URI and ODU; and successful deployment of NCSU SEEP-II, phases 1 and 2 moorings.« less