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Title: Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion

Abstract

In this study, I used seismic waveforms recorded within 2 km from the epicenter of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions to invert for the moment-tensor spectra of these explosions. I employed a one-dimensional (1D) Earth model for Green's function calculations. The model was developed from P- and R g-wave travel times and amplitudes. I selected data for the inversion based on the criterion that they had consistent travel times and amplitude behavior as those predicted by the 1D model. Due to limited azimuthal coverage of the sources and the mostly vertical-component-only nature of the dataset, only long-period, volumetric components of the moment-tensor spectra were well constrained.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1296669
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-27280
Journal ID: ISSN 0037-1106
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0037-1106
Publisher:
Seismological Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Yang, Xiaoning. Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1785/0120150263.
Yang, Xiaoning. Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion. United States. doi:10.1785/0120150263.
Yang, Xiaoning. Mon . "Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion". United States. doi:10.1785/0120150263. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1296669.
@article{osti_1296669,
title = {Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion},
author = {Yang, Xiaoning},
abstractNote = {In this study, I used seismic waveforms recorded within 2 km from the epicenter of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions to invert for the moment-tensor spectra of these explosions. I employed a one-dimensional (1D) Earth model for Green's function calculations. The model was developed from P- and Rg-wave travel times and amplitudes. I selected data for the inversion based on the criterion that they had consistent travel times and amplitude behavior as those predicted by the 1D model. Due to limited azimuthal coverage of the sources and the mostly vertical-component-only nature of the dataset, only long-period, volumetric components of the moment-tensor spectra were well constrained.},
doi = {10.1785/0120150263},
journal = {Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America},
number = 4,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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