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Title: Additive manufacturing capabilities applied to inertial confinement confusion at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Abstract

We describe the use at Los Alamos National Laboratory of additive manufacturing (AM) for a variety of jigs and coating, assembly, and radiography fixtures. Additive manufacturing has also been used to produce shipping containers of complex design that would be too costly to have fabricated using traditional techniques. The current goal for AM use in target fabrication is to increase target accuracy and rigidity. This has been realized by implementing AM into target stalk fabrication, allowing increased complexity to address target strength and the addition of features for alignment at facilities. As a result, we will describe the fabrication of these components and our plans to utilize AM in the future.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1296667
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-27023
Journal ID: ISSN 1536-1055
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Fusion Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1536-1055
Publisher:
American Nuclear Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; Additive Manufacturing, Rapid Prototype; Additive Manufacturing; Rapid Prototype; Inertial Confinement Fusion; High Energy Density Plasma Physics

Citation Formats

Cardenas, Tana, Schmidt, Derek William, and Peterson, Dominic S. Additive manufacturing capabilities applied to inertial confinement confusion at Los Alamos National Laboratory. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.13182/FST15-249.
Cardenas, Tana, Schmidt, Derek William, & Peterson, Dominic S. Additive manufacturing capabilities applied to inertial confinement confusion at Los Alamos National Laboratory. United States. doi:10.13182/FST15-249.
Cardenas, Tana, Schmidt, Derek William, and Peterson, Dominic S. 2016. "Additive manufacturing capabilities applied to inertial confinement confusion at Los Alamos National Laboratory". United States. doi:10.13182/FST15-249. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1296667.
@article{osti_1296667,
title = {Additive manufacturing capabilities applied to inertial confinement confusion at Los Alamos National Laboratory},
author = {Cardenas, Tana and Schmidt, Derek William and Peterson, Dominic S.},
abstractNote = {We describe the use at Los Alamos National Laboratory of additive manufacturing (AM) for a variety of jigs and coating, assembly, and radiography fixtures. Additive manufacturing has also been used to produce shipping containers of complex design that would be too costly to have fabricated using traditional techniques. The current goal for AM use in target fabrication is to increase target accuracy and rigidity. This has been realized by implementing AM into target stalk fabrication, allowing increased complexity to address target strength and the addition of features for alignment at facilities. As a result, we will describe the fabrication of these components and our plans to utilize AM in the future.},
doi = {10.13182/FST15-249},
journal = {Fusion Science and Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • Capability to fill inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets with DT has recently been established at the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The target filling system provides DT-filled glass targets for the U.S. National ICF Program. Tritium storage, purification, mixing, analysis, and high pressure capabilities at WETF are used to provide DT at pressures up to 400 atm to a target filling cell that can operate at temperatures to 400{degree}C. Isotopically pure tritium is obtained from the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at LANL, and typically has purities of 99% tritium or better. At WETF, amore » palladium-silver diffuser is used for removal of decay {sup 3}He from tritium prior to mixing with deuterium. After preparation, DT mixtures are stored in a passivated volume to minimize impurity accumulation from stainless steel. Analysis of tritium and DT mixtures is performed with a quadrupole mass spectrometer/beta scintillation detector system that utilizes an analytical technique previously developed at LANL to provide hydrogen isotope, helium, and impurity analysis. Glass targets are filled in aluminum eggcrates. The target filling cell has been designed to contain two eggcrates while maintaining isothermal conditions across the eggcrates during diffusion filling of targets. Results from a cryogenic condensation technique performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have confirmed the fill pressures. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • Inertial confinement fusion research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is focused on high-leverage areas of thermonuclear ignition to which LANL can apply its historic strengths and that are complementary to high-energy-density-physics topics. Using the Trident and Omega laser facilities, experiments are pursued in laser-plasma instabilities, symmetry, Be technologies, neutron and fusion-product diagnostics, and defect hydrodynamics.
  • The Tritium Science and Engineering (AET-3) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performs a variety of activities to support Inertial Fusion (IF) research - both to further fundamental fusion science and to develop technologies in support of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power generation. Inertial fusion ignition target designs have a smooth spherical shell of cryogenic Deuterium-Tritium (DT) solid contained within a metal or plastic shell that is a few mm in diameter. Fusion is attained by imploding these shells under the symmetric application of energy beams. For IFE targets the DT solid must also survive the process of injectingmore » it into the power plant reactor. Non-ignition IF targets often require a non-cryogenic DT gas fill of a glass or polymeric shell. In this paper an overview will be given of recent LANL activities to study cryogenic DT layering, observe tritium exposure effects on IF relevant materials, and fill targets in support of IF implosion experiments. (authors)« less
  • Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments require sophisticated diagnostics with temporal resolution measured in tens of picoseconds and spatial resolutions measured in microns. The Los Alamos ICF Program is currently supporting a number of diagnostics on the Nova and Triden laser facilities, and is developing new diagnostics for use on the Omega laser facility. New systems and technologies are being developed for use on the National Ignition Facility, which is expected to be operational early in the next decade.