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Title: Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things

Abstract

The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. Finally, how does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future?

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology
  2. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology and The Interdepartmental Program in Medicinal Chemistry
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1295948
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012484
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
ACS Central Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2374-7943
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Thompson, Stephen, Kilbourn, Michael R., and Scott, Peter J. H.. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acscentsci.6b00178.
Thompson, Stephen, Kilbourn, Michael R., & Scott, Peter J. H.. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things. United States. doi:10.1021/acscentsci.6b00178.
Thompson, Stephen, Kilbourn, Michael R., and Scott, Peter J. H.. 2016. "Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things". United States. doi:10.1021/acscentsci.6b00178.
@article{osti_1295948,
title = {Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things},
author = {Thompson, Stephen and Kilbourn, Michael R. and Scott, Peter J. H.},
abstractNote = {The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. Finally, how does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future?},
doi = {10.1021/acscentsci.6b00178},
journal = {ACS Central Science},
number = 8,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1021/acscentsci.6b00178

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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