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Title: A History of Dark Matter

Abstract

Although dark matter is a central element of modern cosmology, the history of how it became accepted as part of the dominant paradigm is often ignored or condensed into a brief anecdotical account focused around the work of a few pioneering scientists. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a broader historical perspective on the observational discoveries and the theoretical arguments that led the scientific community to adopt dark matter as an essential part of the standard cosmological model.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. U. Amsterdam, GRAPPA
  2. Fermilab
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1294433
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-16-157-A; arXiv:1605.04909
1459227
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Rev.Mod.Phys.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Bertone, Gianfranco, and Hooper, Dan. A History of Dark Matter. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Bertone, Gianfranco, & Hooper, Dan. A History of Dark Matter. United States.
Bertone, Gianfranco, and Hooper, Dan. 2016. "A History of Dark Matter". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1294433.
@article{osti_1294433,
title = {A History of Dark Matter},
author = {Bertone, Gianfranco and Hooper, Dan},
abstractNote = {Although dark matter is a central element of modern cosmology, the history of how it became accepted as part of the dominant paradigm is often ignored or condensed into a brief anecdotical account focused around the work of a few pioneering scientists. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a broader historical perspective on the observational discoveries and the theoretical arguments that led the scientific community to adopt dark matter as an essential part of the standard cosmological model.},
doi = {},
journal = {Rev.Mod.Phys.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 5
}
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