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Title: Increasing EDV Range through Intelligent Cabin Air Handling Strategies: Annual Progress Report

Abstract

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of a Ford Focus Electric demonstrated that a split flow heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system with rear recirculation ducts can reduce cabin heating loads by up to 57.4% relative to full fresh air usage under some conditions (steady state, four passengers, ambient temperature of -5 deg C). Simulations also showed that implementing a continuous recirculation fraction control system into the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) HVAC system can reduce cabin heating loads by up to 50.0% relative to full fresh air usage under some conditions (steady state, four passengers, ambient temperature of -5 deg C). Identified that continuous fractional recirculation control of the OEM system can provide significant energy savings for EVs at minimal additional cost, while a split flow HVAC system with rear recirculation ducts only provides minimal additional improvement at significant additional cost.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1293807
Report Number(s):
NREL/MP-5400-65054
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; computational fluid dynamics; CFD; automotive HVAC system; EV; split flow HVAC system

Citation Formats

Leighton, Daniel, and Rugh, John. Increasing EDV Range through Intelligent Cabin Air Handling Strategies: Annual Progress Report. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1293807.
Leighton, Daniel, & Rugh, John. Increasing EDV Range through Intelligent Cabin Air Handling Strategies: Annual Progress Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1293807.
Leighton, Daniel, and Rugh, John. Mon . "Increasing EDV Range through Intelligent Cabin Air Handling Strategies: Annual Progress Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1293807. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1293807.
@article{osti_1293807,
title = {Increasing EDV Range through Intelligent Cabin Air Handling Strategies: Annual Progress Report},
author = {Leighton, Daniel and Rugh, John},
abstractNote = {Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of a Ford Focus Electric demonstrated that a split flow heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system with rear recirculation ducts can reduce cabin heating loads by up to 57.4% relative to full fresh air usage under some conditions (steady state, four passengers, ambient temperature of -5 deg C). Simulations also showed that implementing a continuous recirculation fraction control system into the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) HVAC system can reduce cabin heating loads by up to 50.0% relative to full fresh air usage under some conditions (steady state, four passengers, ambient temperature of -5 deg C). Identified that continuous fractional recirculation control of the OEM system can provide significant energy savings for EVs at minimal additional cost, while a split flow HVAC system with rear recirculation ducts only provides minimal additional improvement at significant additional cost.},
doi = {10.2172/1293807},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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