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Title: The Luminosity Measurement for the DZERO Experiment at Fermilab

Abstract

Primary project objective: The addition of University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) human resources supported by this grant helped ensure that Fermilab’s DZERO experiment had a reliable luminosity measurement through the end of Run II data taking and an easily-accessible repository of luminosity information for all collaborators performing physics analyses through the publication of its final physics results. Secondary project objective: The collaboration between the UNL Instrument Shop and Fermilab’s Scintillation Detector Development Center enhanced the University of Nebraska’s future role as a particle detector R&D and production facility for future high energy physics experiments. Overall project objective: This targeted project enhanced the University of Nebraska’s presence in both frontier high energy physics research in DZERO and particle detector development, and it thereby served the goals of the DOE Office of Science and the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) for the state of Nebraska.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1293302
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-08ER46490
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Snow, Gregory R. The Luminosity Measurement for the DZERO Experiment at Fermilab. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1293302.
Snow, Gregory R. The Luminosity Measurement for the DZERO Experiment at Fermilab. United States. doi:10.2172/1293302.
Snow, Gregory R. 2016. "The Luminosity Measurement for the DZERO Experiment at Fermilab". United States. doi:10.2172/1293302. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1293302.
@article{osti_1293302,
title = {The Luminosity Measurement for the DZERO Experiment at Fermilab},
author = {Snow, Gregory R.},
abstractNote = {Primary project objective: The addition of University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) human resources supported by this grant helped ensure that Fermilab’s DZERO experiment had a reliable luminosity measurement through the end of Run II data taking and an easily-accessible repository of luminosity information for all collaborators performing physics analyses through the publication of its final physics results. Secondary project objective: The collaboration between the UNL Instrument Shop and Fermilab’s Scintillation Detector Development Center enhanced the University of Nebraska’s future role as a particle detector R&D and production facility for future high energy physics experiments. Overall project objective: This targeted project enhanced the University of Nebraska’s presence in both frontier high energy physics research in DZERO and particle detector development, and it thereby served the goals of the DOE Office of Science and the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) for the state of Nebraska.},
doi = {10.2172/1293302},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • We continue evaluation of the new electronics developed for the Central Fiber Tracker and Preshower detectors. With the custom TriP chip and MCM II we have measured the position of the hits along the fiber by comparing the time of arrival of the photons at the VLPC with the expected timing relative to the beam. The measured rms resolution at the center of the fibers is 46cm for hits with more than 8 photo-electrons and is dominated by the statistics of photon arrival time. The corresponding resolution near the ends of the fibers (where more photoelectrons are collected) is calculatedmore » to be of order 27cm. With a second submission of the TriP chip to add the time-of-flight measuring capability we will effectively double the number of channels in the central fiber tracker. This capability will increase the maximum luminosity at which D0 can do tracking from {approx} 100 {center_dot} 10{sup 30}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} to {approx} 200 {center_dot} 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} (at a bench mark tracking specification). The cost of replacing the electronics is of order $500K and the necessary lead time is 1.5 years.« less
  • An additional regenerator will be added to the E731 spectrometer in the MC beamline at Fermilab to enable us to measure the phase difference between the CP violation parameters eta/sub 00/ and eta/sub +-/ to an accuracy of 1/sup 0/. Very general considerations indicate that CPT conservation requires the phase difference, ..delta..phi = Arg(eta/sub 00/) - Arg(eta/sub +-/), to be smaller than one degree. The current experimental value is ..delta..phi = (9.4 +- 5.1)/sup 0/.
  • In the present paper we give the experimental measurement of the cross section per nucleon for the elastic J/{psi} photoproduction in six energy intervals from 100 GeV to 450 GeV; the overall d{sigma}/dt differential cross section, as well as an estimate of the coherent diffractive photoproduction off the Be nucleus. We will finally compare the energy dependence of our measured cross sections with the predictions of the PGF Model.
  • Improving our ability to identify the top quark pair (t{bar t}) primary vertex (PV) on an event-by-event basis is essential for many analyses in the lepton-plus-jets channel performed by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Collaboration. We compare the algorithm currently used by CDF (A1) with another algorithm (A2) using Monte Carlo simulation at high instantaneous luminosities. We confirm that A1 is more efficient than A2 at selecting the t{bar t} PV at all PV multiplicities, both with efficiencies larger than 99%. Event selection rejects events with a distance larger than 5 cm along the proton beam between the t{barmore » t} PV and the charged lepton. We find flat distributions for the signal over background significance of this cut for all cut values larger than 1 cm, for all PV multiplicities and for both algorithms. We conclude that any cut value larger than 1 cm is acceptable for both algorithms under the Tevatron's expected instantaneous luminosity improvements.« less