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Title: X-ray simulation algorithms used in ISP

Abstract

ISP is a simulation code which is sometimes used in the USNDS program. ISP is maintained by Sandia National Lab. However, the X-ray simulation algorithm used by ISP was written by scientists at LANL – mainly by Ed Fenimore with some contributions from John Sullivan and George Neuschaefer and probably others. In email to John Sullivan on July 25, 2016, Jill Rivera, ISP project lead, said “ISP uses the function xdosemeters_sim from the xgen library.” The is a fortran subroutine which is also used to simulate the X-ray response in consim (a descendant of xgen). Therefore, no separate documentation of the X-ray simulation algorithms in ISP have been written – the documentation for the consim simulation can be used.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)
OSTI Identifier:
1291276
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-25871
TRN: US1601706
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; X RADIATION; ALGORITHMS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DOCUMENTATION; I CODES; FORTRAN; FUNCTIONS

Citation Formats

Sullivan, John P. X-ray simulation algorithms used in ISP. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1291276.
Sullivan, John P. X-ray simulation algorithms used in ISP. United States. doi:10.2172/1291276.
Sullivan, John P. 2016. "X-ray simulation algorithms used in ISP". United States. doi:10.2172/1291276. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1291276.
@article{osti_1291276,
title = {X-ray simulation algorithms used in ISP},
author = {Sullivan, John P.},
abstractNote = {ISP is a simulation code which is sometimes used in the USNDS program. ISP is maintained by Sandia National Lab. However, the X-ray simulation algorithm used by ISP was written by scientists at LANL – mainly by Ed Fenimore with some contributions from John Sullivan and George Neuschaefer and probably others. In email to John Sullivan on July 25, 2016, Jill Rivera, ISP project lead, said “ISP uses the function xdosemeters_sim from the xgen library.” The is a fortran subroutine which is also used to simulate the X-ray response in consim (a descendant of xgen). Therefore, no separate documentation of the X-ray simulation algorithms in ISP have been written – the documentation for the consim simulation can be used.},
doi = {10.2172/1291276},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

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