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Title: Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing

Abstract

Innovation in the design and manufacturing of wind power generation components continues to be critical to achieving our national renewable energy goals. As a result of this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program and Advanced Manufacturing Office are partnering with public and private organizations to apply additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, to the production of wind turbine blade molds.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOEEE (USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1291049
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 3D MANUFACTURING; WIND TURBINE BLADES; MOLD; 3D PRINTER

Citation Formats

Zayas, Jose, and Johnson, Mark. Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Zayas, Jose, & Johnson, Mark. Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing. United States.
Zayas, Jose, and Johnson, Mark. 2016. "Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1291049.
@article{osti_1291049,
title = {Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing},
author = {Zayas, Jose and Johnson, Mark},
abstractNote = {Innovation in the design and manufacturing of wind power generation components continues to be critical to achieving our national renewable energy goals. As a result of this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program and Advanced Manufacturing Office are partnering with public and private organizations to apply additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, to the production of wind turbine blade molds.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • When building a wind turbine, you want to make it as tall as possible to capture stronger, faster winds aloft. But taller tower bases become too large to be transported over the road—a constraint that has kept average U.S. wind turbine heights at 80 meters for the last 10 years. A Lab-Corps project undertaken by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found a potential solution: automated concrete manufacturing.
  • ORNL Researcher Hassina Bilheux explains the ability of SNS to explore the internal structure of a 3D-printed turbine blade.
  • The video displays the Inconel 718 Turbine Blade made by Additive Manufacturing. First a gray scale neutron computed tomogram (CT) is displays with transparency in order to show the internal structure. Then the neutron CT is overlapped with the engineering drawing that was used to print the part and a comparison of external and internal structures is possible. This provides a map of the accuracy of the printed turbine (printing tolerance). Internal surface roughness can also be observed.
  • NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provides experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, space for assembling components and turbines for atmospheric testing as well as office space for industry researchers. Fort Felker, center director at the NWTC, discusses NREL's state-of-the-art structural testing capabilities and shows a flapwise and edgewise blade test in progress.
  • This is a full version of a time lapse taken on Aug. 21 when a 1.5 megawatt wind turbine was installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center. (There is no sound with this video.)