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Title: Energy Department to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit

Abstract

On July 11-12, mobility and transportation leaders from across the country are coming to Washington, D.C. for the inaugural Sustainable Transportation Summit hosted by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOEEE (USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1291008
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; FUEL CELL ELECTRIC VEHICLES; TRANSPORTATION; SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION SUMMIT

Citation Formats

Sarkar, Reuben. Energy Department to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Sarkar, Reuben. Energy Department to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit. United States.
Sarkar, Reuben. 2016. "Energy Department to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1291008.
@article{osti_1291008,
title = {Energy Department to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit},
author = {Sarkar, Reuben},
abstractNote = {On July 11-12, mobility and transportation leaders from across the country are coming to Washington, D.C. for the inaugural Sustainable Transportation Summit hosted by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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