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Title: Characterizing X-ray Attenuation of Containerized Cargo

Abstract

X-ray inspection systems can be used to detect radiological and nuclear threats in imported cargo. In order to better understand performance of these systems, the attenuation characteristics of imported cargo need to be determined. This project focused on developing image processing algorithms for segmenting cargo and using x-ray attenuation to quantify equivalent steel thickness to determine cargo density. These algorithms were applied to over 450 cargo radiographs. The results are summarized in this report.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1289389
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-699242
TRN: US1601694
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; X RADIATION; CARGO; STEELS; ATTENUATION; ALGORITHMS; IMAGE PROCESSING; DENSITY; THICKNESS; INSPECTION; X-RAY DETECTION

Citation Formats

Birrer, N., Divin, C., Glenn, S., Martz, H., and Wang, G. Characterizing X-ray Attenuation of Containerized Cargo. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1289389.
Birrer, N., Divin, C., Glenn, S., Martz, H., & Wang, G. Characterizing X-ray Attenuation of Containerized Cargo. United States. doi:10.2172/1289389.
Birrer, N., Divin, C., Glenn, S., Martz, H., and Wang, G. 2016. "Characterizing X-ray Attenuation of Containerized Cargo". United States. doi:10.2172/1289389. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1289389.
@article{osti_1289389,
title = {Characterizing X-ray Attenuation of Containerized Cargo},
author = {Birrer, N. and Divin, C. and Glenn, S. and Martz, H. and Wang, G.},
abstractNote = {X-ray inspection systems can be used to detect radiological and nuclear threats in imported cargo. In order to better understand performance of these systems, the attenuation characteristics of imported cargo need to be determined. This project focused on developing image processing algorithms for segmenting cargo and using x-ray attenuation to quantify equivalent steel thickness to determine cargo density. These algorithms were applied to over 450 cargo radiographs. The results are summarized in this report.},
doi = {10.2172/1289389},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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