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Title: Density-functional theory computer simulations of CZTS 0.25 Se 0.75 alloy phase diagrams

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1287751
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0006334
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 145; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-12-26 02:55:23; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chagarov, E., Sardashti, K., Haight, R., Mitzi, D. B., and Kummel, A. C. Density-functional theory computer simulations of CZTS 0.25 Se 0.75 alloy phase diagrams. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959591.
Chagarov, E., Sardashti, K., Haight, R., Mitzi, D. B., & Kummel, A. C. Density-functional theory computer simulations of CZTS 0.25 Se 0.75 alloy phase diagrams. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959591.
Chagarov, E., Sardashti, K., Haight, R., Mitzi, D. B., and Kummel, A. C. 2016. "Density-functional theory computer simulations of CZTS 0.25 Se 0.75 alloy phase diagrams". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959591.
@article{osti_1287751,
title = {Density-functional theory computer simulations of CZTS 0.25 Se 0.75 alloy phase diagrams},
author = {Chagarov, E. and Sardashti, K. and Haight, R. and Mitzi, D. B. and Kummel, A. C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959591},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 145,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4959591

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
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