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Title: The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA
  2. State University of New York, Syracuse NY USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1287747
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:01:25; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-104X
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ssegane, Herbert, Zumpf, Colleen, Cristina Negri, M., Campbell, Patty, Heavey, Justin P., and Volk, Timothy A. The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/bbb.1679.
Ssegane, Herbert, Zumpf, Colleen, Cristina Negri, M., Campbell, Patty, Heavey, Justin P., & Volk, Timothy A. The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/bbb.1679.
Ssegane, Herbert, Zumpf, Colleen, Cristina Negri, M., Campbell, Patty, Heavey, Justin P., and Volk, Timothy A. 2016. "The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics". United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/bbb.1679.
@article{osti_1287747,
title = {The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics},
author = {Ssegane, Herbert and Zumpf, Colleen and Cristina Negri, M. and Campbell, Patty and Heavey, Justin P. and Volk, Timothy A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/bbb.1679},
journal = {Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining},
number = 6,
volume = 10,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/bbb.1679

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Cited by 1
  • Short-rotation coppice systems like shrub willow are projected to be an important source of biomass in the United States for the production of bioenergy, biofuels, and renewable bio-based products, with the potential for auxiliary environmental benefits and multifunctional systems. Almost three decades of research has focused on the development of shrub willow crops for biomass and ecosystem services. The current expansion of willow in New York State (about 500 ha) for the production of renewable power and heat has been possible because of incentive programs offered by the federal government, commitments by end users, the development of reliable harvesting systems,more » and extension services offered to growers. Improvements in the economics of the system are expected as willow production expands further, which should help lower establishment costs, enhance crop management options and increase efficiencies in harvesting and logistics. As a result, deploying willow in multifunctional value-added systems provides opportunities for both potential producers and end users to learn about the system and the quality of the biomass feedstock, which in turn will help overcome barriers to expansion.« less
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  • Development of dedicated bioenergy crop production systems will require accurate yield estimates, which will be important for determining many of the associated environmental and economic impacts of their production. Shrub willow (Salix spp) is being promoted in areas of the USA and Canada due to its adaption to cool climates and wide genetic diversity available for breeding improvement. Willow breeding in North America is in an early stage, and selection of elite genotypes for commercialization will require testing across broad geographic regions to gain an understanding of how shrub willow interacts with the environment. We analyzed a dataset of first-rotationmore » shrub willow yields of 16 genotypes across 10 trial environments in the USA and Canada for genotype-by-environment interactions using the additive main effects and multiplicative interactions (AMMI) model. Mean genotype yields ranged from 5.22 to 8.58 oven-dry Mg ha -1 yr -1. Analysis of the main effect of genotype showed that one round of breeding improved yields by as much as 20% over check cultivars and that triploid hybrids, most notably Salix viminalis × S. miyabeana, exhibited superior yields. We also found important variability in genotypic response to environments, which suggests specific adaptability could be exploited among 16 genotypes for yield gains. Strong positive correlations were found between environment main effects and AMMI parameters and growing environment temperatures. These findings demonstrate yield improvements are possible in one generation and will be important for developing cultivar recommendations and for future breeding efforts.« less
    Cited by 1