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Title: The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA
  2. State University of New York, Syracuse NY USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1287747
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1288982
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:01:25; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-104X
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ssegane, Herbert, Zumpf, Colleen, Cristina Negri, M., Campbell, Patty, Heavey, Justin P., and Volk, Timothy A. The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/bbb.1679.
Ssegane, Herbert, Zumpf, Colleen, Cristina Negri, M., Campbell, Patty, Heavey, Justin P., & Volk, Timothy A. The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/bbb.1679.
Ssegane, Herbert, Zumpf, Colleen, Cristina Negri, M., Campbell, Patty, Heavey, Justin P., and Volk, Timothy A. Tue . "The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics". United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/bbb.1679.
@article{osti_1287747,
title = {The economics of growing shrub willow as a bioenergy buffer on agricultural fields: A case study in the Midwest Corn Belt: Shrub Willow Economics},
author = {Ssegane, Herbert and Zumpf, Colleen and Cristina Negri, M. and Campbell, Patty and Heavey, Justin P. and Volk, Timothy A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/bbb.1679},
journal = {Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining},
number = 6,
volume = 10,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Tue Aug 09 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Aug 09 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/bbb.1679

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Cited by 3
  • Short-rotation coppice systems like shrub willow are projected to be an important source of biomass in the United States for the production of bioenergy, biofuels, and renewable bio-based products, with the potential for auxiliary environmental benefits and multifunctional systems. Almost three decades of research has focused on the development of shrub willow crops for biomass and ecosystem services. The current expansion of willow in New York State (about 500 ha) for the production of renewable power and heat has been possible because of incentive programs offered by the federal government, commitments by end users, the development of reliable harvesting systems,more » and extension services offered to growers. Improvements in the economics of the system are expected as willow production expands further, which should help lower establishment costs, enhance crop management options and increase efficiencies in harvesting and logistics. As a result, deploying willow in multifunctional value-added systems provides opportunities for both potential producers and end users to learn about the system and the quality of the biomass feedstock, which in turn will help overcome barriers to expansion.« less
  • A case study of the Upper Chester River Watershed Project describes the project and the controversy it has engendered over the environmental peril of agricultural drainage projects and the difficulty environmental agencies confront in seeking to compel agencies with different interests and constituencies to consider the environmental consequences of their actions. A review of the federal regulation suggests that current law provides insufficient mechanisms to ensure that these issues are addressed in the planning and implementation of projects by the Corps of Engineers. The authors propose that the Environmental Protection Agency exercise its preemptory authority under the Federal Water Pollutionmore » Control Act to prohibit or restrict the project.« less
  • Here, the root biomass is an important trait often disregarded in woody perennial selection due to the challenge and expense of accurately and efficiently measuring large populations. In this study, we aim to develop a simple method that can predict root dry weight within a diverse shrub willow ( Salix) breeding population representing species hybrids and their parents using root electrical capacitance (REC). The REC method was tested on plants started from cuttings and grown in pots with potting mix in the greenhouse for 11 wk to assess the relationship of REC with 24 biomass traits and its usefulness inmore » allometric models for root and stem dry biomass. As a result, strong linear and positive correlations were found between REC and root dry biomass (r = 0.88). The total proportion of variance of root and stem dry biomass explained by predictors in multiple regression was 85% and 69%, respectively. The relative importance of predictor variables in allometric models was dominated by the contribution of REC. Here, this work provides an efficient and nondestructive technique to indirectly quantify root biomass of genetically diverse shrub willow progeny, which has great promise for selection of genotypes with varying root biomass and for the accurate estimation of belowground carbon sequestration.« less