skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Class 8 Tractor Trailer Platooning: Effects, Impacts, and Improvements

Abstract

This poster provides information about NREL's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The U.S. Department of Energy's interest in platooning stems from the opportunity to reduce petroleum consumption. This work addresses the need for data and analysis on what aspects of operation can impact platooning savings and what can be done to maximize the savings realized.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1287438
Report Number(s):
NREL/PO-5400-66766
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the Automated Vehicle Symposium, 19-21 July 2016, San Francisco, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; semi-automated truck platooning; fuel savings; reduce aerodynamic drag

Citation Formats

Lammert, Mike, Gonder, Jeff, Kelly, Kenneth, Salari, Kambiz, and Ortega, Jason. Class 8 Tractor Trailer Platooning: Effects, Impacts, and Improvements. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Lammert, Mike, Gonder, Jeff, Kelly, Kenneth, Salari, Kambiz, & Ortega, Jason. Class 8 Tractor Trailer Platooning: Effects, Impacts, and Improvements. United States.
Lammert, Mike, Gonder, Jeff, Kelly, Kenneth, Salari, Kambiz, and Ortega, Jason. 2016. "Class 8 Tractor Trailer Platooning: Effects, Impacts, and Improvements". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1287438.
@article{osti_1287438,
title = {Class 8 Tractor Trailer Platooning: Effects, Impacts, and Improvements},
author = {Lammert, Mike and Gonder, Jeff and Kelly, Kenneth and Salari, Kambiz and Ortega, Jason},
abstractNote = {This poster provides information about NREL's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The U.S. Department of Energy's interest in platooning stems from the opportunity to reduce petroleum consumption. This work addresses the need for data and analysis on what aspects of operation can impact platooning savings and what can be done to maximize the savings realized.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • This poster describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The NREL study addressed the need for data on American style line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics and over a range of trucking speeds common in the United States.
  • This presentation summarizes NREL's recent class 8 tractor trailer platooning testing, including analysis of SAE J1321 Type II fuel consumption testing, fuel consumption improvement, fuel economy and platooning position accuracy.
  • Measurements were made of the base pressure distribution and the aerodynamic drag of a variety of 1/8th-scale tractor-trailer truck models in a wind tunnel at yaw angles ranging from 0/sup 0/ to 20/sup 0/. Base-drag coefficients and overall aerodynamic-drag coefficients were calculated from this data. The measurements show that the base-drag coefficient of typical tractor-trailer trucks does not vary much with vehicle configuration, and that base drag constitutes approximately 13 to 15% of the total aerodynamic drag at zero yaw. The base drag increases in magnitude and also becomes a larger part of the overall aerodynamic drag as yaw anglemore » increases, reaching about 18 to 25% of the overall drag at 20/sup 0/ yaw. Streamlining the forebody of the vehicle has little effect on the base-drag coefficient, but increases the fraction of the overall aerodynamic drag due to the base.« less
  • A wind-tunnel study was made of the reduction of the aerodynamic drag of tractor-trailor trucks due to turning vanes used to control flow separation. A variety of vane settings and positions was investigated on the tractor and on the trailer. It was found that substantial drag reductions were obtained by employing vanes on the lower part of the front vertical edges of the tractor. Vanes mounted elsewhere had a smaller effect on the aerodynamic drag. Vane setting, turning angle and edge radius were found to be highly important.
  • The effect of gap width on the aerodynamic drag of a cab-over-engine tractor-trailer combination has been investigated for full-scale gap widths ranging from 0.61 m (24 in.) to 1.83 m (72 in.) over a yaw angle range of 0 to 20 deg. The average drag on the vehicle was found to increase by 16% as the gap width increased from 0.61 m to 1.83 m. Drag reductions were found when a vertical seal was placed along the vehicle center line between the tractor and the tailer. Generally, the drag reduction increased as the percentage of gap width that was sealedmore » increased, and as the yaw angle increased. The average drag coefficient reduction provided by a full gap seal increased from 0.02 to 0.05 as the gap width increased from 0.61 m to 1.4 m and then decreased slightly for gap widths up to 1.83 m. The effect of vehicle configuration on gap seal effectiveness was evaluated for a gap width of 1.3 m (51 in.) using models of six different tractors and two different trailers. The average drag coefficient reductions that were found ranged from 0.04 to 0.08 with 83% of the data being either 0.04 or 0.05. It is shown that the use of gap seals on the nearly half-million vehicles which comprise the nation's long-haul trucking fleet can result in the conservation of about 1.4 x 10/sup 9/ liters (0.37 x 10/sup 9/ gal) of motor fuel each year.« less