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Title: Microgrid Controller and Advanced Distribution Management System Survey Report

Abstract

A microgrid controller, which serves as the heart of a microgrid, is responsible for optimally managing the distributed energy resources, energy storage systems, and responsive demand and for ensuring the microgrid is being operated in an efficient, reliable, and resilient way. As the market for microgrids has blossomed in recently years, many vendors have released their own microgrid controllers to meet the various needs of different microgrid clients. However, due to the absence of a recognized standard for such controllers, vendor-supported microgrid controllers have a range of functionalities that are significantly different from each other in many respects. As a result the current state of the industry has been difficult to assess. To remedy this situation the authors conducted a survey of the functions of microgrid controllers developed by vendors and national laboratories. This report presents a clear indication of the state of the microgrid-controller industry based on analysis of the survey results. The results demonstrate that US Department of Energy funded research in microgrid controllers is unique and not competing with that of industry.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1287035
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/288
TE1201000; CETE004
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Liu, Guodong, Starke, Michael R., and Herron, Andrew N. Microgrid Controller and Advanced Distribution Management System Survey Report. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1287035.
Liu, Guodong, Starke, Michael R., & Herron, Andrew N. Microgrid Controller and Advanced Distribution Management System Survey Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1287035.
Liu, Guodong, Starke, Michael R., and Herron, Andrew N. Fri . "Microgrid Controller and Advanced Distribution Management System Survey Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1287035. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1287035.
@article{osti_1287035,
title = {Microgrid Controller and Advanced Distribution Management System Survey Report},
author = {Liu, Guodong and Starke, Michael R. and Herron, Andrew N.},
abstractNote = {A microgrid controller, which serves as the heart of a microgrid, is responsible for optimally managing the distributed energy resources, energy storage systems, and responsive demand and for ensuring the microgrid is being operated in an efficient, reliable, and resilient way. As the market for microgrids has blossomed in recently years, many vendors have released their own microgrid controllers to meet the various needs of different microgrid clients. However, due to the absence of a recognized standard for such controllers, vendor-supported microgrid controllers have a range of functionalities that are significantly different from each other in many respects. As a result the current state of the industry has been difficult to assess. To remedy this situation the authors conducted a survey of the functions of microgrid controllers developed by vendors and national laboratories. This report presents a clear indication of the state of the microgrid-controller industry based on analysis of the survey results. The results demonstrate that US Department of Energy funded research in microgrid controllers is unique and not competing with that of industry.},
doi = {10.2172/1287035},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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