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Title: First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector

Abstract

A new type of gaseous micropattern particle detector based on a closed-cell microcavity plasma panel sensor is reported. The first device was fabricated with 1 x 1 x 2 mm cells. It has shown very clean signals of 0.6-2.5 V amplitude, fast rise time of approximately 2 ns and FWHM of about 2 ns with very uniform signal shapes across all pixels. From initial measurements with beta particles from a radioactive source, a maximum pixel efficiency greater than 95% is calculated, for operation of the detector over a 100 V wide span of high voltages (HV). Over this same HV range, the background rate per pixel was measured to be 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than the rate with which the cell was illuminated by the beta source. Pixel-to-pixel count rate uniformity is within 3% and stable within 3% for many days. The time resolution is 2.4 ns, and a very low cell-to-cell crosstalk has been measured between cells separated by 2 mm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [2];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [5];  [5]
  1. University of Michigan
  2. Tel Aviv University, Israel
  3. Integrated Sensors, LLC
  4. ORNL
  5. Tel Aviv University School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv, Israel
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
1287005
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on Radiation Measurements and Applications 2014 (SORMA XV), Ann Arbor, MI, USA, 20140609, 20140612
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ball, Robert, Ben Moshe, M., Benhammou, Yan, Chapman, J. Wehrley, Etzion, E, Ferretti, Claudio, Friedman, Dr. Peter S., Levin, Daniel S., Silver, Yiftah, Varner Jr, Robert L, Weaverdyck, Curtis, Zhou, Bing, Bensimon, R, and Davies, Merlin. First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Ball, Robert, Ben Moshe, M., Benhammou, Yan, Chapman, J. Wehrley, Etzion, E, Ferretti, Claudio, Friedman, Dr. Peter S., Levin, Daniel S., Silver, Yiftah, Varner Jr, Robert L, Weaverdyck, Curtis, Zhou, Bing, Bensimon, R, & Davies, Merlin. First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector. United States.
Ball, Robert, Ben Moshe, M., Benhammou, Yan, Chapman, J. Wehrley, Etzion, E, Ferretti, Claudio, Friedman, Dr. Peter S., Levin, Daniel S., Silver, Yiftah, Varner Jr, Robert L, Weaverdyck, Curtis, Zhou, Bing, Bensimon, R, and Davies, Merlin. Thu . "First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1287005,
title = {First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector},
author = {Ball, Robert and Ben Moshe, M. and Benhammou, Yan and Chapman, J. Wehrley and Etzion, E and Ferretti, Claudio and Friedman, Dr. Peter S. and Levin, Daniel S. and Silver, Yiftah and Varner Jr, Robert L and Weaverdyck, Curtis and Zhou, Bing and Bensimon, R and Davies, Merlin},
abstractNote = {A new type of gaseous micropattern particle detector based on a closed-cell microcavity plasma panel sensor is reported. The first device was fabricated with 1 x 1 x 2 mm cells. It has shown very clean signals of 0.6-2.5 V amplitude, fast rise time of approximately 2 ns and FWHM of about 2 ns with very uniform signal shapes across all pixels. From initial measurements with beta particles from a radioactive source, a maximum pixel efficiency greater than 95% is calculated, for operation of the detector over a 100 V wide span of high voltages (HV). Over this same HV range, the background rate per pixel was measured to be 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than the rate with which the cell was illuminated by the beta source. Pixel-to-pixel count rate uniformity is within 3% and stable within 3% for many days. The time resolution is 2.4 ns, and a very low cell-to-cell crosstalk has been measured between cells separated by 2 mm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Conference:
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