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Title: Community analysis of plant biomass-degrading microorganisms from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park

Abstract

The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels can potentially be improved by employing robust microorganisms and enzymes that efficiently deconstruct plant polysaccharides at elevated temperatures. Many of the geothermal features of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are surrounded by vegetation providing a source of allochthonic material to support heterotrophic microbial communities adapted to utilize plant biomass as a primary carbon and energy source. In this paper, a well-known hot spring environment, Obsidian Pool (OBP), was examined for potential biomass-active microorganisms using cultivation-independent and enrichment techniques. Analysis of 33,684 archaeal and 43,784 bacterial quality-filtered 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences revealed that archaeal diversity in the main pool was higher than bacterial; however, in the vegetated area, overall bacterial diversity was significantly higher. Of notable interest was a flooded depression adjacent to OBP supporting a stand of Juncus tweedyi, a heat-tolerant rush commonly found growing near geothermal features in YNP. The microbial community from heated sediments surrounding the plants was enriched in members of the Firmicutes including potentially (hemi)cellulolytic bacteria from the genera Clostridium, Anaerobacter, Caloramator, Caldicellulosiruptor, and Thermoanaerobacter. Enrichment cultures containing model and real biomass substrates were established at a wide range of temperatures (55–85 °C). Microbial activity was observed up to 80more » °C on all substrates including Avicel, xylan, switchgrass, and Populus sp. Finally, independent of substrate, Caloramator was enriched at lower (<65 °C) temperatures while highly active cellulolytic bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor were dominant at high (>65 °C) temperatures.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center. Biosciences Division; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center. Biosciences Division; Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center. Biosciences Division
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center. Biosciences Division; Marshall Univ., Huntington, WV (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1286694
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Microbial Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 69; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0095-3628
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; thermophiles; biomass utilization; bioenergy; microbial communities; Yellowstone National Park; extremophiles

Citation Formats

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A., Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D., Podar, Mircea, Mosher, Jennifer J., Palumbo, Anthony V., Phelps, Tommy J., Keller, Martin, and Elkins, James G. Community analysis of plant biomass-degrading microorganisms from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1007/s00248-014-0500-8.
Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A., Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D., Podar, Mircea, Mosher, Jennifer J., Palumbo, Anthony V., Phelps, Tommy J., Keller, Martin, & Elkins, James G. Community analysis of plant biomass-degrading microorganisms from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park. United States. doi:10.1007/s00248-014-0500-8.
Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A., Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D., Podar, Mircea, Mosher, Jennifer J., Palumbo, Anthony V., Phelps, Tommy J., Keller, Martin, and Elkins, James G. Thu . "Community analysis of plant biomass-degrading microorganisms from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park". United States. doi:10.1007/s00248-014-0500-8. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1286694.
@article{osti_1286694,
title = {Community analysis of plant biomass-degrading microorganisms from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park},
author = {Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A. and Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D. and Podar, Mircea and Mosher, Jennifer J. and Palumbo, Anthony V. and Phelps, Tommy J. and Keller, Martin and Elkins, James G.},
abstractNote = {The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels can potentially be improved by employing robust microorganisms and enzymes that efficiently deconstruct plant polysaccharides at elevated temperatures. Many of the geothermal features of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are surrounded by vegetation providing a source of allochthonic material to support heterotrophic microbial communities adapted to utilize plant biomass as a primary carbon and energy source. In this paper, a well-known hot spring environment, Obsidian Pool (OBP), was examined for potential biomass-active microorganisms using cultivation-independent and enrichment techniques. Analysis of 33,684 archaeal and 43,784 bacterial quality-filtered 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences revealed that archaeal diversity in the main pool was higher than bacterial; however, in the vegetated area, overall bacterial diversity was significantly higher. Of notable interest was a flooded depression adjacent to OBP supporting a stand of Juncus tweedyi, a heat-tolerant rush commonly found growing near geothermal features in YNP. The microbial community from heated sediments surrounding the plants was enriched in members of the Firmicutes including potentially (hemi)cellulolytic bacteria from the genera Clostridium, Anaerobacter, Caloramator, Caldicellulosiruptor, and Thermoanaerobacter. Enrichment cultures containing model and real biomass substrates were established at a wide range of temperatures (55–85 °C). Microbial activity was observed up to 80 °C on all substrates including Avicel, xylan, switchgrass, and Populus sp. Finally, independent of substrate, Caloramator was enriched at lower (<65 °C) temperatures while highly active cellulolytic bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor were dominant at high (>65 °C) temperatures.},
doi = {10.1007/s00248-014-0500-8},
journal = {Microbial Ecology},
number = 2,
volume = 69,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Oct 16 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu Oct 16 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

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