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Title: Final Report: Self Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units

Abstract

This report outlines the development of a self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The self-roughening concrete produced as part of this research was assessed in SC structures at three scales: small-scale shear-friction specimens, mid-scale beams tested in in-plane and out-of-plane bending, and a full-scale validation test using an SC module produced by Westinghouse as part of the Plant Vogtle expansion. The experiments show that the self-roughening concrete can produce a cold-joint surface of 0.25 inches (6 mm) without external vibration during concrete placement. The experiments and subsequent analysis show that the shear friction provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9 can be used to assess the shear capacity of the cold-joints in SC modular construction, and that friction coefficient of 1.35 is appropriate for use with these provisions.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  2. Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1285866
Report Number(s):
DOE-GeorgiaTech-00667
DOE Contract Number:
NE0000667
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; steel-composite construction, nuclear reactor construction, self-consolidating concrete, shear-friction in concrete members

Citation Formats

Gentry, Russell, Kahn, Lawrence, Kurtis, Kimberly, Petrovic, Bojan, Loreto, Giovanni, Van Wyk, Jurie, and Canterero-Leal, Carlos. Final Report: Self Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1285866.
Gentry, Russell, Kahn, Lawrence, Kurtis, Kimberly, Petrovic, Bojan, Loreto, Giovanni, Van Wyk, Jurie, & Canterero-Leal, Carlos. Final Report: Self Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units. United States. doi:10.2172/1285866.
Gentry, Russell, Kahn, Lawrence, Kurtis, Kimberly, Petrovic, Bojan, Loreto, Giovanni, Van Wyk, Jurie, and Canterero-Leal, Carlos. 2016. "Final Report: Self Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units". United States. doi:10.2172/1285866. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1285866.
@article{osti_1285866,
title = {Final Report: Self Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units},
author = {Gentry, Russell and Kahn, Lawrence and Kurtis, Kimberly and Petrovic, Bojan and Loreto, Giovanni and Van Wyk, Jurie and Canterero-Leal, Carlos},
abstractNote = {This report outlines the development of a self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The self-roughening concrete produced as part of this research was assessed in SC structures at three scales: small-scale shear-friction specimens, mid-scale beams tested in in-plane and out-of-plane bending, and a full-scale validation test using an SC module produced by Westinghouse as part of the Plant Vogtle expansion. The experiments show that the self-roughening concrete can produce a cold-joint surface of 0.25 inches (6 mm) without external vibration during concrete placement. The experiments and subsequent analysis show that the shear friction provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9 can be used to assess the shear capacity of the cold-joints in SC modular construction, and that friction coefficient of 1.35 is appropriate for use with these provisions.},
doi = {10.2172/1285866},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report focuses on work completed on DE-NE0000667, Self-Consolidating Concrete for Modular Units, in connection with the Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (DOE-NEET) program. This project was completed in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with Westinghouse Corporation as the industrial partner. The primary objective of this project was to develop self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) mixtures so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed andmore » validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The SCC mixtures developed were able to carry shearing forces across the cold-joint boundaries. This “self-roughening” was achieved by adding a tailored fraction of lightweight aggregate (LWA) to the concrete mix, some of which raised to the surface during curing, forming a rough surface on which subsequent concrete placements were made. The self-roughening behavior was validated through three sets of structural tests. Shear friction on small-scale specimens with cold joints was assessed using varying fractions of LWA and with varying amounts of external steel plate reinforcement. The results show that the shear friction coefficient, to be used with the provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9, can be taken as 1.35. Mid-scale beam tests were completed to assess the cold-joint capacity in both in-plane and out-of-plane bending. The results showed that the self-roughened joints performed as well as monolithic joints. The final assessment was a full-scale test using a steel composite module supplied by Westinghouse and similar in construction to the steel composite modules being assembled at the Vogtle and V.C. Summer plant expansions. The final test showed that the roughened cold-joint showed excellent shear and flexural capacity, and substantial ductility, when used in conjunction with steel composite construction.« less
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  • This report is one of a series of reports prepared as part of a recent study sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) aimed at updating the state-of-the-art of the design, construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation of continuous reinforced concrete (CRC) pavements. The scope of work of the FHWA study included the following: (1) Conduct of a literature review and preparation of an annotated bibliography on CRC pavements and CRC overlays. (2) Conduct of a field investigation and laboratory testing related to 23 existing in-service pavement sections. This was done to evaluate the effect of various design features on CRC pavementmore » performance, to identify any design or construction related problems, and to recommend procedures to improve CRC pavement technology. (3) Evaluation of the effectiveness of various maintenance and rehabilitation strategies for CRC pavements. (4) Preparation of a Summary Report on the current state of the practice for CRC pavements. Each of the above four items is addressed in a separate report. The following reports have been prepared under this study: Performance of CRC Pavements. Volume 1: Summary of Practice and Annotated Bibliography. Volume 2: Field Investigation of CRC Pavements. Volume 3: Analysis and Evaluation of Field Test Data. Volume 4: Resurfacing for CRC Pavements. Volume 5: Maintenance and Repair of CRC Pavements. Volume 6: CRC Pavement Design, Construction, and Performance. Volume 7: Summary. This report is Volume 6 in the series.« less
  • The collapse of the natural-draft hyperbolic concrete cooling tower unit no. 2 at the Pleasants Power Station at Willow Island, West Virginia, was investigated by the National Bureau of Standards. The investigation included on-site inspections, laboratory tests of construction assembly components and concrete specimens, and analytical studies. Based on the results of these field, laboratory, and analytical investigations, it was concluded that the most probable cause of the collapse was due to the imposition of construction loads on the shell before the concrete of lift 28 had gained adequate strength to support these loads.